Handmade Paper Rocks!

The Sunday Paper #175, September 16, 2017

Paper of the Week: Handmade Paper

Let’s celebrate handmade paper today! We just wrapped up the second session of the Red Cliff Paper Retreat (I’ll share photos soon) and lots of paper was made by makers with all levels of experience. Making a sheet of paper is really quite a simple process, but setting up a studio is expensive and requires a space that can get wet. Here’s a list of places where you can go to make paper (please let me know of places I’ve missed).

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In the Studio:

Next on my agenda is finalizing the copy for the 2018 Twelve Months of Paper Calendar, which will be available in just a couple of weeks, yay!

Papery Tidbits

  • I’m offering two workshops in Denver that include creating a selection of these projects plus a copy of the calendar and a custom paper pack. Join me at Highline Cohousing Community (November 4) or at the Arvada Arts Center (November 5).
  • Contact me if you’d like to organize your own Twelve Months of Paper workshop!

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Hand Papermaking Magazine’s auction is now live. Support this amazing organization as you take advantage of fantastic deals on all sorts of paper-related items: equipment and supplies, books on paper and book arts, fine handmade papers, art works, paper experiences, and much more (I’ve donated a set of watermarked word broadsides).

Has anyone participated in NYC’s Morningside Lights lantern parade? It’s been going on since 2012 and you can participate in lantern making events this week leading up to the parade next Saturday.

Artists in New York State: Dieu Donné Papermill has an amazing Workspace Residency Program! The deadline is September 29th and you don’t need to have any papermaking experience to apply!

I wrote about this paper pinwheel project a few months ago when submissions were being accepted. Did any of you participate? This summer, Brooklyn’s Prospect Park was home to more than 7,000 pinwheel ‘flowers’, which blanketed over 2 and half acres of rolling lawn. And the inside of each pinwheel was embellished by a community participant.

Here’s a twofer: the Guild of Bookworkers is a national organization with regional chapters that are active in all areas of book arts. I enjoyed this recent GBW interview by Pamela Train Leutz with Alicia Bailey, a book artist, instructor and artist’s book dealer.

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Sunday Paper ClickIf you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left (I made that paper) to see how you can provide support.

And if you run a paper-related business, you might be interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks again to those of you who have pledged your support, and enjoy your Sunday!

Southwestern Paper

The Sunday Paper #174, September 10, 2017

Paper of the Week: Woven Reversible Unryu

People often tell me they have drawers full of paper and they won’t allow themselves to purchase one more sheet until their stash dwindles. But then I hear them saying they can’t bring themselves to use a beautiful sheet of paper, so perhaps that is the real issue. I’m okay with you framing a sheet of paper and hanging it on the wall, but if it is just stashed in a drawer, I don’t see the point. Put it to use! I’ve been using this reversible thai unryu paper for a few years now and love it. It has a cloth-like texture but is a bit stiffer. We made these woven paper journals (with a double pamphlet stitch to add pages on the inside) at my Red Cliff Paper Retreat on Friday using the reversible unryu for the cover. Notice the woven paper hinge that creates a closure on the foredge.

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In the Studio:

The Red Cliff Paper Retreat is in session! It is such a (good) change to have company in the studio! I rent out the gym in the old schoolhouse too, so that each participant has a nice big work area in addition to this shared papermaking space.

Papery Tidbits

  • It isn’t too late to start thinking about next year’s Red Cliff Paper Retreat, which takes place the week/end after Labor Day. The page currently describes this year’s event, and I’ll let you know when the next event is listed. Registration begins in January 2018.
  • The Paper Lanterns Online Class is starting in about 10 days (begins September 20th). As the days shorten and the light fades, join us and learn how to make six illuminated paper projects.

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There are several paper shows that just opened in the Southwest (an extra reason to visit Taos & Santa Fe)! Curated by Lynn Sures, a wealth of experimentation and innovation is being explored in a new exhibition titled “Paper, Paper, Paper” in the Encore Gallery at the Taos Community Auditorium. The show runs through October 29th.

‘Wisp,’ section of a triptych by Priscilla Robinson

Nearby, the Santa Fe Book Arts Group (BAG) just opened their annual members show at the Capitol Rotunda GalleryDr. Cynthia Sanchez, Executive Director of the Capitol Art Foundation, selected 112 pieces by 71 artists to include in the show this year. “Portable Magic: The Art of the Book” is on view through December 15th. 

These wall sculptures by Canadian artist Andrew Ooi at Boxheart Gallery in Pittsburgh incorporate techniques traditionally found in Japanese joinery and origami. Hundreds of small strips of handmade gampi paper are cut, painted, folded and connected. I enjoyed reading the writer’s observation of how the pieces feel different when displayed on the wall verses under glass.

Andrew Ooi’s “Edo Check”

For your bathroom reading pleasure: toilet paper printed with you know who’s tweets!

Make a note to shop for papermaking goodies during Hand Papermaking’s annual online auction which starts on Friday, September 15th (I’ll post a live link next Sunday). Help this great organization continue its mission to advance traditional and contemporary ideas in the art of hand papermaking while taking advantage of some fantastic deals on all sorts of paper-related items: equipment and supplies, books on paper and book arts, fine handmade papers, art works, paper experiences, and much more!

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Sunday Paper ClickIf you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left (I made that paper) to see how you can provide support.

And if you run a paper-related business, you might be interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks again to those of you who have pledged your support, and enjoy your Sunday!

Paper Money

The Sunday Paper #173, September 3, 2017

Paper of the Week: Bank Note Paper

I’m thinking of starting a new column called Paper Money. I used to be so scared of money – in particular how to make a living at this paper gig (which includes many facets such as earnings, strategies, sales, marketing, and more) – and it isn’t something people usually talk about. If this sounds intriguing, would you leave a comment below? I’ve learned a thing or two over the past 25 years and would love to create an organic dialogue around it. In the meantime, I glanced at this wikipedia page about paper bank notes and found this image. I hate to say it, but many banknotes today are made from polymers (i.e. plastic) for many reasons.

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In the Studio:

Things are settling down here in Colorado as the first fall leaves are beginning to glow. My husband and dog are back from taking our son to Chicago for his freshman year at DePaul University, and we are adjusting to the empty nest syndrome. My thoughts tend to linger on worries rather than missing the kids – Will he get up for class on time? Will she learn to speak German? Will he eat? Will she make friends? Time will tell!

I am busy preparing to welcome a dozen paper enthusiasts to my studio for the Red Cliff Paper Retreat, which begins on Friday! Our theme this year is sculptural books, and this is a teaser for a technique I’ll be introducing. I used a drawing on pellon as a guide for placing text on a sheet of wet paper. Once the paper is dry, it gets cut and folded into an unusual bookish structure, with the text in the right place!

Papery Tidbits

  • It isn’t too late to start thinking about next year’s Red Cliff Paper Retreat, which takes place the week/end after Labor Day. The page currently describes this year’s event, and I’ll let you know when the next event is listed. Registration begins in January 2018.
  • I’m going to be in San Antonio October 19-23 to teach a workshop (it’s full) at the SW School of Art. I am planning on spending a couple of additional days in the area visiting special collections libraries and papermakers. Let me know if you have other suggestions for me, or perhaps you need a paper consultation?
  • The Paper Lanterns Online Class is still open for registration (begins September 20th). As the days shorten and the light fades, join us and learn how to make six illuminated paper projects.

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Take a look at this! The University of Illinois Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering has made a pair of crawling robots, Peri and Poly, out of little more than a sheet of paper, a few 3D printed parts, and a handful of screws.

On the topic of money, when I moved to a somewhat remote area of Colorado, I turned to the internet to generate business, because you, dear readers, live all over the world. It is so interesting to read about other companies who are running paper businesses online, like this one! Paperless Post launched in 2009 to prove that communication could be personal and well-designed regardless of the medium (as it’s name suggests, the invitations they produced then were all digital). Now they are partnering with Paper Source, a 34-year-old destination for people who love beautiful paper, as their exclusive print partner. In January, you’ll be able to find both digital and printed designs in 125 Paper Source stores around the country.

PRNewsfoto/Paper Source

Paperpot Co. has developed a super cool paper pot transplanter (that’s pot, as in a pot for a plant; I live in Colorado, you know). Click through to watch the video and see for yourself. Paper surrounds soil and seeds and aids in the transfer of plants into the ground, turning hours of work into minutes. Ingenious!

Speaking of pot (i.e. the kind you smoke). The author of this article shows you how to roll a joint (please note that I’m not suggesting that you do this) using an index card, a manila file folder, the back flap of a checkbook, a magazine subscription card or a business card.

I enjoyed this article about musician Ben Folds (I wonder if that is his real last name) who played his second set at a concert based on requests from the audience which were sent to the stage via paper airplane!

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Sunday Paper ClickIf you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left (I made that paper) to see how you can provide support.

And if you run a paper-related business, you might be interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks again to those of you who have pledged your support, and enjoy your Sunday!

Origami Tea House

The Sunday Paper #172, August 27, 2017

Paper of the Week: Thoreau’s Paper-covered Journals

Abelardo Morell’s “Thoreau: 40 Journals in Chronological Order.” Credit Edwynn Houk Gallery

Do you keep a journal? Usually the contents are the main event (as they certainly are in these as well) but this is a photograph depicts the paper covers of Henry Thoreau’s journals, which are on display Tuesday through September 10th at the Morgan Library and Museum in NYC. “Thoreau: 40 Journals in Chronological Order” is part of “This Ever New Self: Thoreau and His Journal,” which traces his life through notebooks and other artifacts.

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In the Studio:

I’ll be honest, this week was a doozy! I just got back into the studio yesterday after spending the week in the hospital with my mother, who fell the day before my son left for college and fractured her pelvis. I’m rather exhausted after navigating through new situations, but found a renewed energy once I set foot back into my familiar workplace. I’m super excited about the book structures I’m developing for the Red Cliff Paper Retreat that takes place in my studio in just two weeks. I’ll share images after the retreat!

In the meantime, here’s a new podcast episode with Ron and Jennifer Rich of Oblation Papers & Press, an urban paper mill, letterpress print shop, hand-bindery and fine paper boutique in Portland, Oregon. Their in-house team of designers releases roughly 30 new items annually, inspired by music, quirky conversation, toys, textiles, travel, food, architecture, literature and historical objects. Have a listen!

Papery Tidbits

  • The Paper Lanterns online class is still open for registration. Register now and receive a free 2017 Twelve Months of Paper Calendar with your supply kit!
  • Speaking of calendars, the 2018 Twelve Months of Paper Calendar is coming!!! The photography is done, the text is written, and it is currently being designed. Copies will be available for pre-order in late September.
  • Want to work with me in person? Meet me on Whidbey Island (October 5-8) or find me in San Antonio (October 20-22).
  • If you are in Iowa City, my newest artist’s book Tangential is in the Handy Books exhibition, which opened last week.

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I love it when someone takes a technique and turns it on its head. You’ve probably seen the cute and colorful origami characters made from these folded origami sections. Katagiri Architecture + Design took these paper modules to another level when they created Shi-An, a nomadic teahouse built with hundred of pieces of folded paper without the need for any glue. The minimalist structure embodies a Japanese sense of beauty and an appreciation of the concept of transience.

I recently discovered the work of Andi Arnovitz when a former online class participant visited her studio in Israel and told her about me and this blog. Andi sent me a note introducing herself. I’m so glad she did, and I think you will be too! Her works make powerful statements about women and feature paper in a variety of forms.

© Andi Arnovitz 2006, The Missing, paper clay, paint and stain, steel, wood, 39 x 176 cm

Did you put on a pair of these solar eclipse viewing glasses last week (made of paper)? Here’s an interesting article about American Paper Optics — one of the major American manufacturers of NASA-approved eclipse glasses. And the owner, John Jerit, is a major folk art collector to boot!

The Morgan Conservatory of Art in Cleveland just celebrated it’s 10th anniversary. The Morgan is one of the premier institutions in the country with an extensive internship program, an artist residency program, workshops of all kinds, galleries and more.

Founder & Artistic Director Tom Balbo pulls a large sheet of Western-style abaca paper – photo courtesy of Jacqueline Bon

If you find yourself in Maine this week, check out these two talks at Bowdoin during Bowdoin Book Week, On Materiality, A Cultural Consideration of Paper and the Book with Nicholas Basbanes (author of On Paper) and Appreciating Paper: Art’s Best Supporting Actor (I love that title!) with Ruth Fine, former curator of special projects at the National Gallery of Art and Marjorie Shelley from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, who will explain how historic European artists chose their papers as well as the genesis of the importance of works on paper. These both sound fascinating, and if you’re not in Maine, the Basbanes lecture will be live streamed. Details at the link!  

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Sunday Paper ClickIf you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left (I made that paper) to see how you can provide support.

And if you run a paper-related business, you might be interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks again to those of you who have pledged your support, and enjoy your Sunday!

Fat Magic

The Sunday Paper #171, August 20, 2017

Paper of the Week: Thermochromic Stamp Paper

Are you ready for the solar eclipse tomorrow? Have you seen the stamps? I purchased a sheet and the paper is treated to be heat activated (remember mood rings)? Truth be told, my thumb must not be hot enough, so I finally breathed some hot air on the middle stamp and lo and behold, the moon appeared! Who knew? A Colorado company, Chromatic Technologies, developed the special ink… and the title of the blog post comes from “the special kinds of fat that come from vegetable sources — really specific chemicals with an exact melting point.”

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In the Studio:

My biannual online paper sale is going on right now (through August 25th). Click on over to view what’s left. I’m happy/sorry to report that all of the abaca and mystery packs are gone. Cotton papers and word broadsides are still available!

The mystery paper pack includes 20 assorted sheets of handmade paper ranging in size from 5″ x 7″ to 9″ x 12″.

Papery Tidbits

  • Want to work with me in person? Grab a last spot in my retreat (September 8-10 or 12-14), meet me on Whidbey Island (October 5-8) or find me in San Antonio (October 20-22).
  • I created a video of my latest artist’s book, Tangential, which was inspired by the 1570 edition of Euclid’s Elements of Geometry. Have a look!

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I met Julia Garretson at the Oregon College of Arts & Crafts years ago. She’s been interested in papermaking since she was a kid and it is now a integral part of her life. This is a lovely documentary about her work and life, and I love the title: To the Last Fiber.

Cut Up/Cut Out is a traveling paper cut exhibition which is now in Bellevue and features over 50 artists.

I love the use of paper in this piece by Yuko Kimura at the Verne Collection in Cleveland.

“Evening Shimmer,” monotype on antique Japanese woodblock pages and collage

Wowza! A $30,000 coloring book? The pages are handmade paper (European, I presume) and the illustrations can be customized. I do hope that the artist, Ian Beck, is receiving his fair share!

These book table lights are pretty cool. I’m not sure they are made from paper, but they sure could be!

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Sunday Paper ClickIf you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left (I made that paper) to see how you can provide support.

And if you run a paper-related business, you might be interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks again to those of you who have pledged your support, and enjoy your Sunday!

Inflatable Paper

The Sunday Paper #170, August 13, 2017

Paper of the Week: Tracing Paper

Paper Lanterns Inflatable from Helen Hiebert on Vimeo.

I created the Text Ball almost 10 years ago and it’s still going strong (even after traveling around the world). And believe it or not, it’s made of plain old tracing paper. It was a challenge to figure out how to create the pattern for the panels, stamp the text (an Ezra Pound quote: The book should be a ball of light in one’s hand), and assemble the panels while keeping the text properly oriented! Inflating it (like you see me doing in the video) was is exciting!

We’ll be making an inflatable lantern in my online class Paper Lanterns. Grab your spot at the best rate now (the fee goes up on Wednesday)! Registration continues into early September, and class begins September 20th.

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In My Life:

Wow, that was quick! I seems like just yesterday that these two were toddling. I remember making paper with Will in a backpack! Now he’s 18 and Lucah will celebrate her sweet 16 on the day of the solar eclipse! Will is heading to Chicago for college and Lucah is settling into her new home as an exchange student in Germany. The next phase begins!

Papery Tidbits

  • My biannual online starts next Sunday. Whet your appetite for these Word Broadsides, two abaca packages, watermarks and a mystery package!
  • Want to work with me in person? Grab a last spot in my retreat (September 8-10 or 12-14), meet me on Whidbey Island (October 5-8) or find me in San Antonio (October 20-22).
  • Edwards/CO peeps. I’m offering a paper weaving workshop tomorrow (Monday August 14th) at the Alpine Arts Center. Join me!

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Jenn Woodward runs Pulp & Deckle Studio in Portland and just finished this unique portrait project. She drew 60+ subjects on handmade papers with embedded seeds. The next phase of the project involves planting the paper, but the experiences of all of the sitters is sure to live on in their minds. Jenn noticed that people rarely look closely at each other, and she thought if they did they might understand each other better. So she created “Fruits of the sun (for all the unknowns),” an art project to promote empathy. Watch the video and stay tuned for an upcoming podcast episode with Jenn on Paper Talk.

There are so many great nuggets in this story. I met Darren Simpson when I attended an International Association of Papermakers and Paper Artists (IAPMA) conference in Tasmania in 2009. And according to this story, he learned to make paper as a teenager through an unemployment support program. And he’s still at it! Read all about the unique fibers he uses (this photo might give you a clue) and check out Creative Paper Tasmania the next time you’re on that side of the globe.

Now that’s a paper airplane! The artist, Kiel Johnson, is also trying to make the world’s largest paper garden.

Check out Bridge Project in San Antonio, whose mission is to empower the creativity of others by offering unique making opportunities to businesses, individuals, and the community. Paper Clouds was created by local members of the architecture and design community.

Here’s an interesting article about the origins and traditions of Chinese oil-paper umbrellas.

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Sunday Paper ClickIf you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left (I made that paper) to see how you can provide support.

And if you run a paper-related business, you might be interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks again to those of you who have pledged your support, and enjoy your Sunday!

Reminiscence Papers

The Sunday Paper #169, August 5, 2017

Paper of the Week: Reminiscence Papers

When I was in Oregon in June, I reconnected with Debra Glanz at the Focus on Book Arts trade fair, where we were both vendors. Debra designs and produces a lovely line of printed papers for book arts and scrapbooking. She’s having a sale during August over on her Etsy site. Be sure to poke around the other pages on her site – she makes the sweetest books, boxes & more, all covered in her gorgeous patterned papers.

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In the Studio:

I love the loops that life takes! And it’s fun to reflect on how one thing leads to another, which you can only see when looking back. In 1989, I had the opportunity to visit Japan – and the shoji screens I saw there inspired the shadow lantern structure below. This is one of the six projects we’ll be making in my upcoming online class, Paper Lanterns.  Will you join us?

Read all about the class, watch the video introduction and download your free paper tutorial here.

One of the things I love about this project is it’s versatility: you can create multiple panels, it’s reversible, hinge allows the panels to flex in both directions, and the structure can be a book, a folding screen or a lantern!

Papery Tidbits

  • My biannual online paper sale is coming soon and will feature abaca in various muted colors watermarked broadsides & more!
  • Want to work with me in person? Grab a last spot in my retreat (September 8-10 or 12-14), meet me on Whidbey Island (October 5-8) or find me in San Antonio (October 20-22).

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Old cameras are almost a thing of the past, which makes these paper renditions even more delightful. Korean artist Lee Ji-hee has recreated a selection of vintage cameras out of bright, colorful paper which makes them much funkier than their original counterparts. Click through to see a fantastic selection.

Ooh la la! These pieces must be powerful to view in person. This spring Miso completed the final installment of a trilogy she has worked on over the past three years. Each of the three installations (titled “Surface to Air,” “Fallout,” and “Sarcophagus”) includes vast paper “tapestries” that catalogue places on Earth that have known trauma: Ukraine, Fukushima, and Chernobyl, respectively. Visually, the hand-hammered pinholes in these works mimic the stitches of a woven tapestry.

In Fallout, pinhole-punch works of art map the topography of ground zero at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, emulating the folds of abandoned fishnets she saw there.
(Photo: Miso)

Yay! Aimee Lee, whose life work has been mastering and sharing Korean papermaking traditions, is portrayed in this beautiful CNN video. Enjoy!

If you’re in Omaha, the late artist Mary Beth Fogarty is featured in Gallery 72’s August exhibition. Titled The Art of Abstraction, the show features drawings and paintings on paper.

Long Journey Home by Mary Jane Fogarty

This papercraft electronics activity book looks like it could keep a child of any age busy for a long time!

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Sunday Paper ClickIf you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left (I made that paper) to see how you can provide support.

And if you run a paper-related business, you might be interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks again to those of you who have pledged your support, and enjoy your Sunday!

Paper Lanterns

The Sunday Paper #168, July 30, 2017

Paper of the Week: Japanese Linen Paper

I recently discovered this Japanese Linen Paper (available from Washi Arts). It is a beautiful quality textured card stock that comes in two weights and a variety of colors. It’s the perfect choice for this Shadow Lantern project that we’ll be making in my new online course, Paper Lanterns (see below)!

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In the Studio:

Registration opens today for Paper Lanterns, my new online class. Please watch the video trailer to learn all about the class! I’ve put together a curated collection of papers for you to work your way through the projects as we:

  • Delve into a variety of techniques (paper cutting, weaving, tessellations, pop-ups, & more)
  • Explore a unique selection of papers and lighting mechanisms
  • Discover a variety of fasteners for bringing paper into the round
  • Get inspired to go beyond the course with ideas for variations on each project

Class begins September 20th!

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It’s pretty cool when commercial printing company makes a product featuring 100% cotton (tree-free) paper. Check out Moo.com‘s cotton business cards: 100% Recycled – made from cotton t-shirts. Scroll down on the page to watch the infomercial. I’m pretty certain they are using Cheney, which is the same 100% cotton rag pulp we papermaker’s use… anyone out there know which company is making the paper for Moo?

This is a lovely project that we should all participate in! Founder Maryann Talia Pau started the global weaving project, called One Million Stars to End Violence, to encourage people to be the “light and kindness they want to see in the world.” All of the stars from countries around the world, made by solo individuals or at specially created Star Weave Jams, will become part of an art installation for the 2018 Commonwealth Games, April 4-5 on the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.

‘One Million Stars to End Violence’ is a global project destined for the 2018 Commonwealth Games. Chloe Garner, right, was one of many who helped create around 200 stars. SUSAN DOOLAN/PHOTO

This is a lovely story about a Japanese village that is continuing the tradition of kamiko (making clothes from handmade paper).

Bananas aren’t just for eating anymore!  In India, they are turning the plant’s fiber into all sorts of products, including paper. Jenny Pinto, whom I mentored in my studio 17 years ago, has developed a line of banana paper lights and other products in a thriving business that she runs out of her Bangalore studio.

NASA is looking at crowdsourcing designs for a foldable radiation shield. Are you the origami whiz who can come up with the best design? Submit your entry!

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Sunday Paper ClickIf you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left (I made that paper) to see how you can provide support.

And if you run a paper-related business, you might be interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks again to those of you who have pledged your support, and enjoy your Sunday!

Origami Coloring Paper

The Sunday Paper #167, July 23, 2017

Paper of the Week: Origami Coloring Paper

I found these four designs in a standard origami pack when I was visiting Japantown in San Francisco earlier this year. If you ever get there, you must go to Paper Tree (click through, they feature a how-to origami video every week)! And while you are in the area, Daiso is a huge Japanese department store with lots of paper products + more, plus there’s an underground mall with other shops and restaurants (and a mochi cart, yum)!

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In the Studio:

I have been busy creating a video-trailer for my online class, Paper Lanterns, which I’ll share with you when registration opens next week! These paper inflatables are one of the projects we’ll be making in class.

Papery Tidbits:

  • Paper Lanterns, a new online class, begins September 20th and runs for 6 weeks.
  • View my new artist’s books Vertices and Nebulae.

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This is pretty cool! Zhong Lin Wang and his team at the Georgia Institute of Technology cut sandpaper with lasers and covered them in thin layers of gold and other conductive materials. Then they assembled the pieces into three-dimensional rhombus shapes. These rhombi, which can fit in the palm of one’s hand and fold up to be stored in a wallet or pocket, generate electricity when a person presses on them with their fingers.

Laser-cut paper coated in conductive materials allows this small device to generate electricity just by being squeezed. (American Chemical Society)

This is a fascinating video of the restoration (i.e. paper cleaning) of Albrecht Dürer’s Triumphal Arch that was performed at The British Museum. I love the part about how they figured out how to reach the center areas of this enormous print.

Um, wow! Check out these unusual and extra large piñatas by Justin Favela.

Justin Favela’s “Piñata Motel. 2016” uses paper and glue on an existing motel.| Krystal Ramirez

My kid is heading to Chicago soon, and I’m thinking of getting him this book as a going away present (shhhhh). Frank Lloyd Wright Paper Models: 14 Kirigami Buildings to Cut and Fold, will be released August 1. You get to fold, cut and construct mini paper versions of some of Wright’s most famous buildings.

I’ll spare you the photo on this one, but I like the concept! Reflecting on the poor sex education she received during her teenage years, 27-year-old Chinese artist Pang Danyang decided to design a pop-up book for parents and young girls going through puberty called Body Boom.

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Sunday Paper ClickIf you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left (I made that paper) to see how you can provide support.

And if you run a paper-related business, you might be interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks again to those of you who have pledged your support, and enjoy your Sunday!

Poured Paperworks

The Sunday Paper #166, July 16, 2017

Paper of the Week: Arnold Grummer’s Midwest Paperfest

This is a call to paper artists throughout the midwest. You are invited to exhibit and offer your work for sale at historic Town Square in Green Lake, WI. This juried event offers awards in the categories of handmade paper art, artist trading cards and art on paper. Click here to view the application.

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In the Studio:

If you didn’t catch this on facebook this week, here’s a 36 second video that documents how I’m making the cover for my next artist’s book, Tangential.

Papery Tidbits:

I’ve been working on my website a bit this week and have a few new pages to share with you:

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This kid got into university based on his paper folding skills. How cool is that? He even pointed out that folding paper seems easy but requires a good sense of mathematics and spatial structure (yes!). Sun Hongtao is currently showing his paper folding work in Jinan City, capital of East China’s Shandong Province.

Photo/iqilu.com

I met Sarah Brayer in the early 90’s when she came to edition her poured paperworks at Dieu Donné Papermill in NYC, where I was working at the time. She’s been living in Japan since 1980 and has just published a beautiful book documenting her editioned works in paper. You can view and order a copy here. Check out pages 80/81 to see some of her works created at Dieu Donné.

I enjoyed reading this piece about a one-day art installation by Frank Brannon and Jeff Marley, which took place on the Oconaluftee Island Park in Cherokee, NC. The installation was a representation of a spider and a web made from mulberry wood and mulberry paper. The web contained hidden messages.

HUNGRY: A message is found in the spider’s web that speaks of a relish that takes a real appetite to stomach.

A new book by Zupagrafika lets you toy with constructivism. No glue or scissors required!

Courtesy of Zupagrafika

Watch out! You might fall down the rabbit hole… check out the Super-Cool Fold of the Week, which features a cool new design in paper engineering each week!

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About our sponsor:  Arnold Grummer’s Papermaking is celebrating 40 years of service to the education, art and hand papermaking communities. They continue their dedication to quality supplies and clear instruction to ensure success at home, in the studio, and in the classroom.

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About Me

Hi, I'm Helen Hiebert!
I'm an artist working primarily in handmade paper; I write how-to books and make films about papermaking and paper arts; and I love learning about new techniques and methods for working with paper! You can learn more about me at http://www.helenhiebertstudio.com

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