Free Video Tutorial: Wavy Circular Paper Weaving 

The Sunday Paper #204

April 15, 2018

Thanks to everyone who entered the March Twelve Months of Paper Giveaway for a chance to win a set of Madeleine Durham’s Paste Papers! And the winner is … Sheila Wood. Congratulations!

Paper of the Week: Map Paper + Mingei

This is a new monthly feature on the blog: a video tutorial featuring a paper + a book + a project. This month’s video shows you how to make a Wavy Circular Paper Weaving. I love using maps in paper projects, and I stumbled across a great book filled with printed maps that you tear out and unfold. It’s a really clever design for a book of papers (you’ll see the book in the video), but that’s another topic.

I mention a few resources in the tutorial:

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In the Studio: 

I guess I’ve got circles on my mind! Here’s a drawing I’m working on for a new watermarked handmade paper. I’m preparing this drawing to be cut in vinyl. The circles will be cut out; I will adhere the resulting web of vinyl to my papermaking mould; and when I pull the sheets, a watermark will appear. Stay tuned!

Papery Tidbits

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On the topic of paper weaving, check out these woven photographs by Korean artist Seung Hoon Park.

As a consumer, I appreciate crowdfunding campaigns. Not only do you get to support a project, but you also get perks. Cave Paper is an organization that I’m particularly fond of (they make some of the toughest, most beautiful papers on the planet – I’m serious)! They’re at a crossroads at the moment. Please watch the video at this link and consider joining their campaign. The perks include a set of their gorgeous papers and all sorts of other things ranging from $5 to $1500.

This is such a lovely story about a gesture a child in Utah made that gave an adult an idea, and together they’re on a mission to create 3600 origami flowers for the survivors of the Parkland, Florida school shooting.

© Isaac Hale for The Daily Herald

I love this headline: Stealing Design Secrets from Unexpected Master of OrigamiThat master would be the earwig. Using computer simulations, a team of scientists at ETH Zurich and Purdue University recently studied the complex folding behavior of this master. Their results, published in a recent issue of Science, expand the possibilities of synthetic origami systems like solar sails, bendable electronic displays, and even some biomedical devices.

The 3-D-printed imitation of the earwig wing can be folded as compact as its natural counterpart. However, the automatic folding function so far only works in the simplified prototypes. Image Credit: ETH Zurich.

Check this out: a paper airplane folding machine. The machine is made of various elements, including Legos, and the paper airplane takes flight at the end!

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Sunday Paper Click

If you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left to learn how. Or, perhaps you’re interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks to everyone who has already pledged your support! It makes a difference!

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Paste Paper Giveaway

The Sunday Paper #203

April 8, 2018

Paper of the Week: It’s Giveaway Time Again!

Click through to win! Madeleine Durham create’s playful one-of-a-kind paste papers using a brush technique which blends multiple colors while creating dynamic yet tranquil patterns. Her papers have been used by fine book binders and calligraphers around the world. They also lend themselves well to covering boxes and using in collage. Her papers are created on Arches text wove using Golden acrylics and Shofu wheat paste. Madeleine’s Paste Papers are loved by people around the globe and she is sure you will enjoy this lovely of group primo scraps (valued at $100.00).

Madeleine Durham Paste Papers is the April sponsor for the Twelve Months of Paper

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Out of the Studio: 

I’m flying back to the states and should be home sweet home by the time you read this. We spent the last week in Landau in der Pfalz, Germany with our daughter and friends I met during my own college exchange program over 30 years ago. They took a short vacation this week, and we were dog- and house-sitters.

Papery Tidbits:

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Local environmental and artistic organizations will collaborate on a project highlighting the importance of pollinators in the environment when the Sun Valley Center for the Arts unveils its next BIG IDEA project, “Bees,” this coming Friday in Ketchum, ID. Thousands of paper bees have been cut from the handmade sheets with embedded seeds and adorn the walls of The Center’s gallery. The remaining bees will be placed on The Center lot in Ketchum this summer, alongside other plant starts and seeds, to emerge into a pollinator pasture.

Cameron Cartiere and the chART Collective, “All Is for Yourself” laser-cut handmade paper, seeds, birch plywood.

The SLOW READ is a literary/art project honoring the 100-year anniversary of the publication of Willa Cather’s novel, “My Ántonia”. Artist Barb Tetenbaum has been exploring the pages of this novel for several years now, and she needs our help (here’s a link to her Kickstarter campaign + a video about the project) for the next iteration. High quality images from the book’s first edition will be projected at public sites in Nebraska, Oregon and beyond. The entire novel will be revealed page-by-page starting in late May and ending in August. Three or more page spreads will be available daily for both unsuspecting passersby to stumble upon and Cather devotees to return to and punctuate each day of their summer.

In case spring hasn’t sprung in your part of the world, check out these amazing paper bouquets by Lea Gray over at Paper Blooms.

You know that saying about a round peg fitting in a square hole? I don’t recall them saying anything about folding the paper… here’s how you can create the trick!

Ellen Rubin is known as The Popuplady. Here’s a short video about the collection she has amassed over the years.

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Sunday Paper Click

If you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left to learn how. Or, perhaps you’re interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks to everyone who has already pledged your support! It makes a difference!

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Paper Art, Architecture & Cinematography

The Sunday Paper #202

April 1, 2018

Paper of the Week: Lokta Paper Makes a Comeback

A women dries the papers during the making process of Nepali paper at her workshop in Nayapati, Sundarijal on Saturday. Post Photo: Anish Regmi

I’ve always loved photos like this, depicting sheets of paper drying outside on screens. I’ve written lokta factories before, which were abundant and thriving over a decade ago in Nepal. But they slowly withered and ultimately pulled down their shutters due to lack of human resources, shortage of raw materials, high production cost and effects of Maoist conflict. These factories are now back in business and are creating jobs for locals.

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Out of the Studio: Visiting Hand Papermakers

I visited with three paper artists in Holland: Petra Poolen and Peter Gentenaar & Patricia Torley. Here’s a studio view showing the sculpture and paintings of Peter & Pat.

Papery Tidbits:

  • If I were in the Bay Area this week, I’d go see Lisa Kokin’s new shredded money pieces at Seager/Gray Gallery.
  • Paper/Print, curated by Susan Gosin & Mina Takashashi opens on April 5th at the International Print Center New York.

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Check out these amazing paper sculptures! Leo Garcia Mendez and Raya Sader Bujana are two Venezuelan artists – one creates tiny realistic constructions in paper and the other takes beautiful photographs.

From a story by Laura Collinson featured on Creative Boom

This is a great idea and great community organization name: Paperworkers Local is an Alabama group that banded together to form a workspace for artists working on paper.

The artists at Paperworkers Local in Birmingham work with a wide variety of styles and subjects. (Karim Shamsi-Basha/Alabama NewsCenter)

Into the Fold: The Art & Science of Origami, is now on view at the Science Museum Oklahoma. “All these folds, they have mathematical computations… a lot of these mathematicians and artists have come up with ways, these folding patterns, to really create any object that you can think of, just by folding a single piece of paper. That takes a lot of math.”

Artist Eric Gjerde employed an estimated 19,000-plus folds and about a month’s worth of time folding to create his 80-foot-long “Dragon Helix” on view in Science Museum Oklahoma’s new exhibit “Into the Fold: The Art and Science of Origami.” [Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman]

Did you know that there is a Guild of Papermakers? It is based in Philadelphia, and here is a little history. The first meeting was held at the papermaking barn of Historic RittenhouseTown, also in Philadelphia, in the fall of 1991. Over the years, the group of 50 – 60 artists has continued to meet almost bi-monthly, held studio and gallery visits, sponsored workshops with several nationally known paper artists, and has held an annual all member Paper Awareness exhibitions.

Guild of Papermakers recent Paper Awareness exhibition at the Abington Art Center

This is a lovely gesture by a student at Seton Hall University. Daniel Kim has launched an origami challenge to students and staff to recycle their old essays, syllabi, and other scraps of paper and turn them into one thousand cranes symbolizing a communal wish for a greener campus and planet. The Ecology Club is erecting a bamboo structure, and origami makers are invited to hang their creations there. Hopefully they’ll publish a photo!

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Sunday Paper Click

If you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left to learn how. Or, perhaps you’re interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks to everyone who has already pledged your support! It makes a difference!

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Papierwerk Glockenbach

The Sunday Paper #201

March 25, 2018

Paper of the Week: Five Books about Paper Lampshades

Paper and light have been a fascination since the beginning of my career. From folding screens to hot air balloons, lamps and lanterns to kites, there are numerous ways to view paper activated by light. This is a round-up of a few books I’ve collected over the years.

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Out of the Studio: Papierwerk Glockenbach

I had the pleasure of visiting a new paper studio in Munich this week: Papierwerk Glockenbach. Annemaria Bar gave me a tour, and we had a lovely visit. The facility offers workshops, an open studio and they have a little gallery in their fully equipped professional papermaking studio.

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Some of us understand more than others how hard it is to make a buck. A family of Venezuelan immigrants to Colombia are repurposing what they deem as worthless bolivars (bucks) into origami-made paper wallets, belts and even purses as the currency plunges further in value. The technique looks like gum wrapper paper chains – did you make those as a kid?

I love these unique cut and layered paper pieces by artist Dylan Metrano.

Origami is being transformed into a engineering discipline, how cool is that? The ancient art of paper folding is showing promise for new technology that ranges from cancer-fighting drugs to foldable armor for police officers, and Suyi Li at Clemson University is hoping to take the practice to the next level in a new research project. His motto: Keep Calm and Origami On!

Suyi Li, center, works in his Clemson University lab with Ph.D. students Priyanka Bhovad, right, and Sahand Sadeghi. Image Credit: Clemson University

Art on Paper was recently in Manhattan. Did anyone get to it?

Megan Rye, “Foundling: Paintings Inspired by Adoption Referral Photographs” (2018)

What a fun story about Bette Nesmith Graham, the inventor of Liquid Paper. “An artist never corrects by erasing, but always paints over the error.”

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Sunday Paper Click

If you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left to learn how. Or, perhaps you’re interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks to everyone who has already pledged your support! It makes a difference!

 

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Best Paper Lampshade Books

PAPER LAMPSHADE BOOK ROUND-UP

Paper and light have been a fascination since the beginning of my career. From folding screens to hot air balloons, lamps and lanterns to kites, there are numerous ways to view paper activated by light. Here’s a round-up of a few books I’ve collected over the years.

Feel free to pin this image to share this resource with the wider paper community.

Some of these books were written awhile ago, but they still have great content! Others are out of print (including my own, see below) but you can still find used copies. Let me know if you have a favorite book about paper and light, and I’ll consider adding it to this list.

The Lamp Shade Book
 

Dawn Cusick, 1996

I think this is the first book I discovered on this topic. It’s a comprehensive how-to book that covers the parts of a lamp, ideas for pairing bases and shades, and 80 traditional and innovative projects to create exciting lighting effects, many of them featuring paper.

Lampshades

 

 

 

Katrin Cargill, 1996

I love the design of this book with it’s spiral binding and fold-out pages featuring how-to instructions beneath the flaps. The book covers all sorts of fabric shades, some of which could be adapted to paper. It is especially helpful in showing how to make patterns to fit fabric to various lampshade frames.

Making Japanese-Style Lamps & Lanterns

 

Edward R. Turner, 2002

The projects in this book require some woodworking skills. I’ve never made any of the lamps, but the images within the pages are full of inspiration. This book has instructions for assembling hanging, floor and table lamps as well as details about wiring lamps, and connecting switches and plugs.

1000 Lights

 

Edited by Charlotte & Peter Fiell

You might call this a lamp design dictionary. Filled with lighting designs from 1878 – 1959 (the title page features Isamu Noguchi’s Akari lights, which are paper), this book has a nice introduction about the evolution of artificial light. The text appears in German and English, and the full-color images are sure to inspire.

Paper Illuminated

Helen Hiebert, 2001

In this book, yours truly shows you how to use paper to craft textured lampshades, patterned window treatments, and stenciled room dividers that gently diffuse light and fill your home with a stylish warmth. Discover techniques to make your paper more interesting, including piercing, layering, and crayon batiking. Be inspired to explore the endlessly exciting possibilities of mixing paper and light.

 

Helen Hiebert Studio participates in the Amazon affiliate advertising program designed to provide a way for sites to earn commissions by linking to Amazon. This means that whenever you buy a book on Amazon from a link here, I get a small percentage of its price, which helps support Helen Hiebert Studio by offsetting the maintenance of this site and the free resources I provide. Thank you!

 
 
 

 

The 200th Edition of the Sunday Paper

The Sunday Paper #200

March 18, 2018

Sunday Paper Click

To celebrate this milestone, if you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left to learn how. Or, perhaps you’re interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks to everyone who has already pledged your support! It makes a difference!

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Paper of the Week: Papermaking Kits

My husband and I are in Europe this month to visit our daughter Lucah who is spending a year in Landau, Germany. We’ve been on the move this first week with a stopover in Iceland (drop dead gorgeous), a quick check-in with Lucah in Landau on our way to the Alps, where we are spending a few days at the Sonnenalp Resort, Lech Zurs (skiing) and Garmisch. Next week we’ll return to Landau, when our daughter has a 2-week school break around Easter.

Look what I found at the hotel gift shop in Germany: a papermaking kit! It was right there on the end of the shelf, staring at me. Here are a few resources for papermaking kits and suppliers. Let me know of you know of others!

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Out of the Studio: New Episode on Paper Talk Featuring Sue Gosin

Paper Talk is my monthly podcast series featuring artists and professionals who are working in the field of hand papermaking. This month I interviewed Sue Gosin, founder and Co-Chair of the Board of Directors of Dieu Donne Papermill, Inc. in New York City. Have a listen!

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Papery Tidbits:

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Steve Messam has created an armada of 180 boats which look like white ‘paper’ creations by day and light up at night. Each craft is made from a special polymer paper that folds and behaves like paper, but is also waterproof and weather resistant. These are on view through April 12th at Paddington Basin in London. Messam creates environmental installations, often with paper. I wrote about one of his paper bridges in this blog post.

 

This is a must-see paper show coming up at the International Print Center New York: Paper/Print: American Hand Papermaking, 1960s to Today, curated by Susan Gosin and Mina Takahashi. This focused exhibition is the first to trace the American hand-papermaking revolution as an outgrowth of the printmaking renaissance. It brings together the best, along with some of the rarest and lesser known examples, of two-dimensional works, artist books, and cast-paper multiples to spotlight the closely intertwined American stories of printmaking and papermaking in the contemporary period.

 

Other, 2009. © Richard Tuttle / Universal Limited Art Editions. Hand-formed, pigmented paper pulp on handmade wooden brackets. 25 x 54 x 3 3/8 in.

Lexus has created a 3D installation, done by perceptual art pioneer Michael Murphy. Titled “Letters”, the 16-foot art piece hangs from six ceiling panels and a steel frame, and features more than 2,000 suspended pieces of origami, each made from individual thank you letters from guests to Lexus dealerships. Watch to the end to see how the car turns into the Lexus logo – it’s pretty cool!

Have you seen the photos of JR? This is one of his photograph’s that popped up in September along the U.S./Mexico border. A 64-foot tall picture of a Mexican child named Kikito who lives just on the other side of the fence — built on scaffolding on Mexican soil, there was nothing U.S. border patrol agents could do about it. JR’s giant photographs have appeared in some 140 countries, sometimes in fancy art galleries, but more often than not pasted illegally on sidewalks and subways, buildings, and rooftops.

The movie A Wrinkle in Time features a flexagon in the opening scene, and this article about the costumes talks about the variety of materials the designers explored, including handmade paper for one of Mrs. Who’s dresses.

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Folded Motif Video Tutorial

The Sunday Paper #199

March 11, 2018

Thanks to everyone who entered the March Twelve Months of Paper Giveaway for a chance to win a subscription to UPPERCASE Magazine! And the winner is… Jeanette Davis. Congratulations!

Paper of the Week: Wrapping Paper Folded Motif

This is a new monthly feature on the blog: a video tutorial featuring a paper and a project. Click here to watch my Folded Motif video tutorial.

I mention a few resources in the tutorial:

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In the Studio: 

The view out the back door of the studio. The rustic skate park is buried in snow!

I’m heading out of the studio tomorrow and off to Europe for a month with my hubby. Our first stop is Iceland. Follow my trip on Instagram, where I hope to post daily. And of course, I’ll be posting to this blog every Sunday as usual!

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Papery Tidbits:

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Here’s a lovely interview with paper artist Catherine Nash, whose installation An Inner Astronomy, is now on view at the Triangle L Ranch in Oracle, AZ. If you can’t make it to Oracle (the closing reception is Sunday, March 18th, 5 – 8 p.m) you can view it via these videos of the installation 

If you have a copy of the Twelve Months of Paper Calendar, have you made the March project, the Spring Shamrock? I’d love to see a photo! Still need a calendar? They are now half price!

Did you see the dress made from book spines by French designer Silvie Facon on Bored Panda? There are some other interesting dresses worth clicking over to see!

Check out these snowflakes based on well-known physicists! You’ll find templates for paper snowflakes with winners of the Nobel Prize in Physics incorporated into the designs.

Sandra Kroupa is celebrating 50 years as a rare books librarian at the University of Washington. She has collected hundreds (if not thousands) of artist’s books, including some of mine. This is a behind the scenes glimpse into her world.

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Sunday Paper Click

If you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left to learn how. Or, perhaps you’re interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks to everyone who has already pledged your support! It makes a difference!

SHARE THIS blog post with your paper-loving friends:

UPPERCASE Magazine Giveaway

The Sunday Paper #198

March 4, 2018

Paper of the Week: It’s Giveaway Time Again!

Click through to win! UPPERCASE is a quarterly ads-free print magazine for the creative and curious with eclectic content inspired by design, typography, illustration and craft. A playful exploration of creativity, an affinity for vintage ephemera, and a love of handmade are some elements common in each issue. The magazine has high-quality paper and printing, a unique design aesthetic and incredible attention to detail. Independent and ads-free, UPPERCASE is adored by a small but enthusiastic readership around the world.

UPPERCASE is the March sponsor for the Twelve Months of Paper

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In the Studio: 

I’m a firm believer in good tools. I’ve added this 12″ x 18″ custom made mould & deckle from Chester Creek Press to my inventory and took it for a test drive this week!

Papery Tidbits:

  • Want to visit me and learn about hand papermaking techniques? The annual Red Cliff Paper Retreat is almost full. If you were thinking of grabbing a spot, now’s the time! This is the only event I hold in my Colorado studio. Join us Sept 7-9 and/or Sept 11-13, 2018.
  • NYC Peeps: this looks like a fantastic panel discussion: Nature as Tool and Material at the Center for Book Arts this Thursday eve.
  • The Byopia Press blog is a lovely book and paper arts blog. And my recent video tutorial was featured on their Friday Night Flicks (cool concept)!

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This is so awesome! There was a Korean Crafts area at the recent olympic games in PyeongChang, South Korea where visitors could make their own origami flower. Denver is considering bidding for the next winter olympics, which would certainly spill over into Vail. Hmmmm….

Great headline: The Art Behind Barichara’s All-Female Artisanal Paper Making. This factory in Columbia employs 11 women, and the article details the papermaking process. I found myself wondering who buys the paper… tourists perhaps?

Hanging the sheets out to dry | © Fundación San Lorenzo de Barichara

I am a novice when it comes to folding paper. These single sheet complex tesselations by Moscow-based paper artist Ekaterina Lukasheva are mind blowing!

© Ekaterina Lukasheva

The exhibition FOLD: Golden Venture Paper Sculptures continues at the Museum of Chinese in America in Manhattan through March 25. The paper sculptures made by Golden Venture passengers between 1993 and 1997, while they waited for their fate to be decided at York County Prison (another heart-wrenching immigration story).

Installation view of FOLD: Golden Venture Paper Sculptures at the Museum of Chinese in America (all images courtesy the Museum of Chinese in America)

Did you learn to write on a Big Chief Tablet? I did! The pattern of the lines (solid/dashed) is imprinted on my brain. Here’s an interesting history of the company that produced those tablets.

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Sunday Paper Click

If you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left to learn how. Or, perhaps you’re interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks to everyone who has already pledged your support! It makes a difference!

SHARE THIS blog post with your paper-loving friends:

Paper On Snow

The Sunday Paper #197

February 25, 2018

Paper of the Week: Five Books about Paper Folding

I have collected books about paper folding, paper engineering and paper design for over 30 years. There are some oldies and goodies that are still circulating out there. Some of these are visual catalogs for inspiration and others are serious how-to manuals. Check out this round-up of Five Books about Paper Folding Techniques.

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In of the Studio: 

It’s finally been snowing here in Colorado and I decided to take some of my paper pieces outside. This was my favorite composition: Paper on Snow.
 
Papery Tidbits:
  • I’ll be teaching two workshops at Idyllwild in SoCal the week of July 4th, and I’d love to see you there!: #1: The Potential of Paper and #2: Paper Sculpture).
  • Register now for the annual Red Cliff Paper Retreat! This is the only event I hold in my Colorado studio. Join us Sept 7-9 and/or Sept 11-13.
  • Have you listened to the latest episode of Paper Talk featuring Priscilla Robinson?

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This is a fascinating article about how pastel artists of the 18th century supersized their pictures by piecing together sheets of paper.

Portrait of Gabriel Bernard de Rieux; Maurice-Quentin de La Tour (French, 1704 – 1788); Paris, France, Europe; 1739 to 1741; Pastel and gouache on paper mounted on canvas; 200.7 × 149.9 cm (79 × 59 in.); The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

It is becoming more popular for origami to be used to teach math and science concepts. I enjoyed reading about how Thomas Hull incorporates paper folding into his lectures. He instructed the audience to use a pen to make a dot in the center of a sheet of origami paper. Then he said to make a few folds over the dot. Once the audience folded their desired amount of folds, he asked them to open the paper back up and count the amount of mountains and valleys the paper had. As people called out their different numbers, he recorded them on a spreadsheet, allowing the audience to see what each of the pairs of numbers had in common. There’s nothing like hands-on learning!

This is a lovely Q&A with Rob Ryan, paper cutter extraordinaire!

I enjoyed these works and sentiments by collage artist Joe Dance: “I collect paper and ephemera from various sources, including what I might find on the street. When I start working on a new collage, I begin with an element that has a particular appeal to me and build from there–pulling in other elements that resonate–tearing, cutting, pasting–responding to balance, color, line and pattern as they present themselves–in essence, painting with paper.”

I’ve never purchased a lottery ticket, but this is a pretty cool paper ad for the Missouri Lottery.

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Sunday Paper Click

If you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left to learn how. Or, perhaps you’re interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks to everyone who has already pledged your support! It makes a difference!

SHARE THIS blog post with your paper-loving friends:

Best Paper Folding Books

PAPER FOLDING ROUND-UP

I have collected books about paper folding, paper engineering and paper design for over 30 years. I began my quest at The Strand in NYC when I lived there in late 80’s/early 90’s. And then I moved to Portland, OR where I discovered the paper craft section at Powell’s Books, ooh la la! I always find a few gems there. I am embarrassed to admit that I have not yet visited The Tattered Cover in my new(ish) home state, but hey, I live 2 hours from Denver!

Feel free to pin this image to share this resource with the wider paper community.

Some of these books were written awhile ago, but they still have great content! Others are out of print, but you can still find used copies. This list is just the tip of the iceberg. I’ll be posting another round-up featuring more books on the subject. Let me know if you have a favorite book about paper folding, and I’ll consider adding it to this list.

Greeting Cards, A Collection from Around the World

Edited by Takenobu Igarashi, 1989

This book is a visual catalog of 300 innovative paper designs from more than 180 designers from around the world. Filled with inspiration, the selection of wedding, birth, and moving announcements, party invitations and holiday cards push the boundaries of graphic design, especially when you consider these designs are from the pre-digital age! Post digital-age pricing is a plus: I purchased this book at NY Central Art Supply in NYC for $34.95 in the late 80’s. Click the link and you’ll be in for a nice surprise!

Three Dimensional Graphics

Edited by Keizo Matsui, 1987

I love the title of this book and it makes me wonder when the phrase paper engineering came to be. This is another visual catalog that features pop-ups, fold-outs, accordion structures, and packaging ideas. These are all from the mid 1900’s but look contemporary. 120 innovative paper pieces by designers from around the world all featuring three-dimensional elements. These days, getting a letter is really special, but getting a three-dimensional card is even better!

Collapsible: The Genius of Space-Saving Design

Per Mollerup, 2001

The jacket of this book features words describing unique ways that designers have utilized  space-saving techniques: compact, compress, condense, contract, deflate, decrease, reduce, implode, wrinkle, pucker, bundle, enclose, break down, ball up, draw in, fold, collapse. The designs featured in this book are not limited to paper, but they will intrigue your imagination. Think blow-up chair, slide rule, nesting fork/knife/spoon, pocket knife, tent and more!

Folding Techniques for Designers, From Sheet to Form

Paul Jackson, 2011

You might call this extreme origami. After postgraduate studies in London, Paul Jackson sent proposals to teach origami to schools with fashion, textile, graphic design and jewelry design departments, and they were into it! He has since taught sheet to form workshops around the world, and this book is filled with ideas for designers working with any kind of sheet material. This is a how-to book with instructions. Bonus! There’s a DVD included with the book, so you can print out the folding patterns.

Paper Folding Templates for Print Design

Trish Witkowski, 2011

This book is filled with inspiration for graphic designers (and book artists). Witkowski catalogs the basic folds most commonly used in graphic design (accrordion, gate, map, and roll folds to name a few), discusses paper types, qualities and sheet sizes, shows examples of printed matter and provides diagrams for how each fold works, along with ideas for pushing boundaries and saving money when designing for print. Check out Trish Witkowski’s 60 Second Super Cool Fold of the Week videos.

Helen Hiebert Studio participates in the Amazon affiliate advertising program designed to provide a way for sites to earn commissions by linking to Amazon. This means that whenever you buy a book on Amazon from a link here, I get a small percentage of its price, which helps support Helen Hiebert Studio by offsetting the maintenance of this site and the free resources I provide. Thank you!

 

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About Me

Hi, I'm Helen Hiebert!
I'm an artist working primarily in handmade paper; I write how-to books and make films about papermaking and paper arts; and I love learning about new techniques and methods for working with paper! You can learn more about me at http://www.helenhiebertstudio.com

Paper Retreat

Papermaking in the Rockies

My How To Books