Inflatable Paper

The Sunday Paper #170, August 13, 2017

Paper of the Week: Tracing Paper

Paper Lanterns Inflatable from Helen Hiebert on Vimeo.

I created the Text Ball almost 10 years ago and it’s still going strong (even after traveling around the world). And believe it or not, it’s made of plain old tracing paper. It was a challenge to figure out how to create the pattern for the panels, stamp the text (an Ezra Pound quote: The book should be a ball of light in one’s hand), and assemble the panels while keeping the text properly oriented! Inflating it (like you see me doing in the video) was is exciting!

We’ll be making an inflatable lantern in my online class Paper Lanterns. Grab your spot at the best rate now (the fee goes up on Wednesday)! Registration continues into early September, and class begins September 20th.

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In My Life:

Wow, that was quick! I seems like just yesterday that these two were toddling. I remember making paper with Will in a backpack! Now he’s 18 and Lucah will celebrate her sweet 16 on the day of the solar eclipse! Will is heading to Chicago for college and Lucah is settling into her new home as an exchange student in Germany. The next phase begins!

Papery Tidbits

  • My biannual online starts next Sunday. Whet your appetite for these Word Broadsides, two abaca packages, watermarks and a mystery package!
  • Want to work with me in person? Grab a last spot in my retreat (September 8-10 or 12-14), meet me on Whidbey Island (October 5-8) or find me in San Antonio (October 20-22).
  • Edwards/CO peeps. I’m offering a paper weaving workshop tomorrow (Monday August 14th) at the Alpine Arts Center. Join me!

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Jenn Woodward runs Pulp & Deckle Studio in Portland and just finished this unique portrait project. She drew 60+ subjects on handmade papers with embedded seeds. The next phase of the project involves planting the paper, but the experiences of all of the sitters is sure to live on in their minds. Jenn noticed that people rarely look closely at each other, and she thought if they did they might understand each other better. So she created “Fruits of the sun (for all the unknowns),” an art project to promote empathy. Watch the video and stay tuned for an upcoming podcast episode with Jenn on Paper Talk.

There are so many great nuggets in this story. I met Darren Simpson when I attended an International Association of Papermakers and Paper Artists (IAPMA) conference in Tasmania in 2009. And according to this story, he learned to make paper as a teenager through an unemployment support program. And he’s still at it! Read all about the unique fibers he uses (this photo might give you a clue) and check out Creative Paper Tasmania the next time you’re on that side of the globe.

Now that’s a paper airplane! The artist, Kiel Johnson, is also trying to make the world’s largest paper garden.

Check out Bridge Project in San Antonio, whose mission is to empower the creativity of others by offering unique making opportunities to businesses, individuals, and the community. Paper Clouds was created by local members of the architecture and design community.

Here’s an interesting article about the origins and traditions of Chinese oil-paper umbrellas.

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Sunday Paper ClickIf you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left (I made that paper) to see how you can provide support.

And if you run a paper-related business, you might be interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks again to those of you who have pledged your support, and enjoy your Sunday!

Reminiscence Papers

The Sunday Paper #169, August 5, 2017

Paper of the Week: Reminiscence Papers

When I was in Oregon in June, I reconnected with Debra Glanz at the Focus on Book Arts trade fair, where we were both vendors. Debra designs and produces a lovely line of printed papers for book arts and scrapbooking. She’s having a sale during August over on her Etsy site. Be sure to poke around the other pages on her site – she makes the sweetest books, boxes & more, all covered in her gorgeous patterned papers.

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In the Studio:

I love the loops that life takes! And it’s fun to reflect on how one thing leads to another, which you can only see when looking back. In 1989, I had the opportunity to visit Japan – and the shoji screens I saw there inspired the shadow lantern structure below. This is one of the six projects we’ll be making in my upcoming online class, Paper Lanterns.  Will you join us?

Read all about the class, watch the video introduction and download your free paper tutorial here.

One of the things I love about this project is it’s versatility: you can create multiple panels, it’s reversible, hinge allows the panels to flex in both directions, and the structure can be a book, a folding screen or a lantern!

Papery Tidbits

  • My biannual online paper sale is coming soon and will feature abaca in various muted colors watermarked broadsides & more!
  • Want to work with me in person? Grab a last spot in my retreat (September 8-10 or 12-14), meet me on Whidbey Island (October 5-8) or find me in San Antonio (October 20-22).

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Old cameras are almost a thing of the past, which makes these paper renditions even more delightful. Korean artist Lee Ji-hee has recreated a selection of vintage cameras out of bright, colorful paper which makes them much funkier than their original counterparts. Click through to see a fantastic selection.

Ooh la la! These pieces must be powerful to view in person. This spring Miso completed the final installment of a trilogy she has worked on over the past three years. Each of the three installations (titled “Surface to Air,” “Fallout,” and “Sarcophagus”) includes vast paper “tapestries” that catalogue places on Earth that have known trauma: Ukraine, Fukushima, and Chernobyl, respectively. Visually, the hand-hammered pinholes in these works mimic the stitches of a woven tapestry.

In Fallout, pinhole-punch works of art map the topography of ground zero at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, emulating the folds of abandoned fishnets she saw there.
(Photo: Miso)

Yay! Aimee Lee, whose life work has been mastering and sharing Korean papermaking traditions, is portrayed in this beautiful CNN video. Enjoy!

If you’re in Omaha, the late artist Mary Beth Fogarty is featured in Gallery 72’s August exhibition. Titled The Art of Abstraction, the show features drawings and paintings on paper.

Long Journey Home by Mary Jane Fogarty

This papercraft electronics activity book looks like it could keep a child of any age busy for a long time!

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Sunday Paper ClickIf you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left (I made that paper) to see how you can provide support.

And if you run a paper-related business, you might be interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks again to those of you who have pledged your support, and enjoy your Sunday!

Paper Lanterns

The Sunday Paper #168, July 30, 2017

Paper of the Week: Japanese Linen Paper

I recently discovered this Japanese Linen Paper (available from Washi Arts). It is a beautiful quality textured card stock that comes in two weights and a variety of colors. It’s the perfect choice for this Shadow Lantern project that we’ll be making in my new online course, Paper Lanterns (see below)!

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In the Studio:

Registration opens today for Paper Lanterns, my new online class. Please watch the video trailer to learn all about the class! I’ve put together a curated collection of papers for you to work your way through the projects as we:

  • Delve into a variety of techniques (paper cutting, weaving, tessellations, pop-ups, & more)
  • Explore a unique selection of papers and lighting mechanisms
  • Discover a variety of fasteners for bringing paper into the round
  • Get inspired to go beyond the course with ideas for variations on each project

Class begins September 20th!

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It’s pretty cool when commercial printing company makes a product featuring 100% cotton (tree-free) paper. Check out Moo.com‘s cotton business cards: 100% Recycled – made from cotton t-shirts. Scroll down on the page to watch the infomercial. I’m pretty certain they are using Cheney, which is the same 100% cotton rag pulp we papermaker’s use… anyone out there know which company is making the paper for Moo?

This is a lovely project that we should all participate in! Founder Maryann Talia Pau started the global weaving project, called One Million Stars to End Violence, to encourage people to be the “light and kindness they want to see in the world.” All of the stars from countries around the world, made by solo individuals or at specially created Star Weave Jams, will become part of an art installation for the 2018 Commonwealth Games, April 4-5 on the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.

‘One Million Stars to End Violence’ is a global project destined for the 2018 Commonwealth Games. Chloe Garner, right, was one of many who helped create around 200 stars. SUSAN DOOLAN/PHOTO

This is a lovely story about a Japanese village that is continuing the tradition of kamiko (making clothes from handmade paper).

Bananas aren’t just for eating anymore!  In India, they are turning the plant’s fiber into all sorts of products, including paper. Jenny Pinto, whom I mentored in my studio 17 years ago, has developed a line of banana paper lights and other products in a thriving business that she runs out of her Bangalore studio.

NASA is looking at crowdsourcing designs for a foldable radiation shield. Are you the origami whiz who can come up with the best design? Submit your entry!

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Sunday Paper ClickIf you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left (I made that paper) to see how you can provide support.

And if you run a paper-related business, you might be interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks again to those of you who have pledged your support, and enjoy your Sunday!

Origami Coloring Paper

The Sunday Paper #167, July 23, 2017

Paper of the Week: Origami Coloring Paper

I found these four designs in a standard origami pack when I was visiting Japantown in San Francisco earlier this year. If you ever get there, you must go to Paper Tree (click through, they feature a how-to origami video every week)! And while you are in the area, Daiso is a huge Japanese department store with lots of paper products + more, plus there’s an underground mall with other shops and restaurants (and a mochi cart, yum)!

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In the Studio:

I have been busy creating a video-trailer for my online class, Paper Lanterns, which I’ll share with you when registration opens next week! These paper inflatables are one of the projects we’ll be making in class.

Papery Tidbits:

  • Paper Lanterns, a new online class, begins September 20th and runs for 6 weeks.
  • View my new artist’s books Vertices and Nebulae.

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This is pretty cool! Zhong Lin Wang and his team at the Georgia Institute of Technology cut sandpaper with lasers and covered them in thin layers of gold and other conductive materials. Then they assembled the pieces into three-dimensional rhombus shapes. These rhombi, which can fit in the palm of one’s hand and fold up to be stored in a wallet or pocket, generate electricity when a person presses on them with their fingers.

Laser-cut paper coated in conductive materials allows this small device to generate electricity just by being squeezed. (American Chemical Society)

This is a fascinating video of the restoration (i.e. paper cleaning) of Albrecht Dürer’s Triumphal Arch that was performed at The British Museum. I love the part about how they figured out how to reach the center areas of this enormous print.

Um, wow! Check out these unusual and extra large piñatas by Justin Favela.

Justin Favela’s “Piñata Motel. 2016” uses paper and glue on an existing motel.| Krystal Ramirez

My kid is heading to Chicago soon, and I’m thinking of getting him this book as a going away present (shhhhh). Frank Lloyd Wright Paper Models: 14 Kirigami Buildings to Cut and Fold, will be released August 1. You get to fold, cut and construct mini paper versions of some of Wright’s most famous buildings.

I’ll spare you the photo on this one, but I like the concept! Reflecting on the poor sex education she received during her teenage years, 27-year-old Chinese artist Pang Danyang decided to design a pop-up book for parents and young girls going through puberty called Body Boom.

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Sunday Paper ClickIf you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left (I made that paper) to see how you can provide support.

And if you run a paper-related business, you might be interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks again to those of you who have pledged your support, and enjoy your Sunday!

Poured Paperworks

The Sunday Paper #166, July 16, 2017

Paper of the Week: Arnold Grummer’s Midwest Paperfest

This is a call to paper artists throughout the midwest. You are invited to exhibit and offer your work for sale at historic Town Square in Green Lake, WI. This juried event offers awards in the categories of handmade paper art, artist trading cards and art on paper. Click here to view the application.

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In the Studio:

If you didn’t catch this on facebook this week, here’s a 36 second video that documents how I’m making the cover for my next artist’s book, Tangential.

Papery Tidbits:

I’ve been working on my website a bit this week and have a few new pages to share with you:

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This kid got into university based on his paper folding skills. How cool is that? He even pointed out that folding paper seems easy but requires a good sense of mathematics and spatial structure (yes!). Sun Hongtao is currently showing his paper folding work in Jinan City, capital of East China’s Shandong Province.

Photo/iqilu.com

I met Sarah Brayer in the early 90’s when she came to edition her poured paperworks at Dieu Donné Papermill in NYC, where I was working at the time. She’s been living in Japan since 1980 and has just published a beautiful book documenting her editioned works in paper. You can view and order a copy here. Check out pages 80/81 to see some of her works created at Dieu Donné.

I enjoyed reading this piece about a one-day art installation by Frank Brannon and Jeff Marley, which took place on the Oconaluftee Island Park in Cherokee, NC. The installation was a representation of a spider and a web made from mulberry wood and mulberry paper. The web contained hidden messages.

HUNGRY: A message is found in the spider’s web that speaks of a relish that takes a real appetite to stomach.

A new book by Zupagrafika lets you toy with constructivism. No glue or scissors required!

Courtesy of Zupagrafika

Watch out! You might fall down the rabbit hole… check out the Super-Cool Fold of the Week, which features a cool new design in paper engineering each week!

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About our sponsor:  Arnold Grummer’s Papermaking is celebrating 40 years of service to the education, art and hand papermaking communities. They continue their dedication to quality supplies and clear instruction to ensure success at home, in the studio, and in the classroom.

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Sunday Paper ClickIf you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left (I made that paper) to see how you can provide support.

And if you run a paper-related business, you might be interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks again to those of you who have pledged your support, and enjoy your Sunday!

Continuum

The Sunday Paper #165, July 9, 2017

Paper of the Week: Watermarked Cotton

This is the fifth in my series of Word Broadsides (individual copies + sets of all 5 will be available in my online paper sale later this month). I love how the image lies subtly within the sheet of paper and without backlighting, is only slightly visible. I often think of my ancestors and decendents and how my life fits into the continuum. The image to me conjures a labyrinth-like path that we have all walked/are walking/will walk.

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In the Studio:

Sometimes I get lonely in the studio, so it was super fun this week to have Daria Wilber here assisting me in the filming of my next online class, Paper Lanterns. Check out the photos from my first class, Paper Illuminated. Paper Lanterns is a brand NEW class, and I hope you’ll consider joining me this fall. Registration opens August 1 and class begins September 20th. It’s back to school, paper style!

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Wow! I love the ways that technology and paper are intermingling. Check out this conductive wallpaper by Flavor Paper. When you touch one of the screen-printed conductive ink tiles, it triggers abstract interpretations of a lamp, a speaker or a fan to “turn on.”

Ann Martin is a blogger extraordinaire (be sure to look up All Things Paper). She’s also an avid quiller and her new book, The Art of Quilling Paper Jewelry is now available for pre-order or as an e-book.

Cyber wallpaper! Six well-known paper artists have created stop motion animations made entirely from folded paper for Google, which have been digitalized into video wallpapers for consumers to download onto Android tablets or smartphones.

Helen Friel’s design for Google

This paper blade can cut through a coconut! What will they think of next?

Here’s a brief history of maps. From Ptolemy to GPS. And here’s another spin on having the whole world in your hands, my artist’s book Handle With Care.

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Sunday Paper ClickIf you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left (I made that paper) to see how you can provide support.

And if you run a paper-related business, you might be interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks again to those of you who have pledged your support, and enjoy your Sunday!

Plantable Paper

The Sunday Paper #164, July 2, 2017

Paper of the Week: Katazome Paper

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Fireworks! I noticed these beauties this week over on Paper Connection International’s Instagram feed, and then I received an e-mail for a special Independence Day offer: Buy 2 Yuzen Papers and Get 3rd one for FREE (a $20 savings). The selection of these decorative papers are sure to put a spark in your step! (Please note: the papers pictured above are not included in the sale selection, but many other beauties are. Be sure to scroll through all seven pages).

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On the Road:

We were in Oregon last week, where I enjoyed teaching a workshop at Focus on Book Arts, seeing old (and meeting new) friends, eating great food, seeing art, walking across the new bridge Tilikum Crossing and more. When in Portland, I always stop by Oblation Papers & Press, a fantastic urban papermill and stationery store. While there, I recorded a podcast (coming soon) with owners Ron & Jennifer Rich and spent time looking at all of the paper goodies in their retail store. They produce these sweet little plantable papers (and many others) in house.

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Papery Tidbits:

  • Please contact me if you’re interested in promoting your business by sponsoring a month in the 2018 Twelve Months of Paper Calendar.
  • I’ll be launching my biannual online paper sale later this month! Stay tuned for a selection of handmade papers you won’t find anywhere else in the world!
  • I’m heading into fall with several workshops. There are still a few spots at my Red Cliff Paper Retreat, or you can join me in my new online class, Paper Lanterns (details coming soon), at the Pacific NW School of Art on Whidbey Island, or at the SW School of Art in San Antonio (details coming soon).

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This is a fascinating story about the life work of Khurshid Gohar Qalam, a Pakistani calligrapher whose work is in collections around the world. He writes on the special paper called wasli (paper made by old Mughal technique) and I love what he says: “I believe we should not forget our roots. We should not forget that calligraphy is part of our heritage, which must not only be preserved but should be made to flourish.” In this spirit, Qalam has passed the tradition along to thousands.

calligraphy

Escape the summer heat with this beautiful handheld fan made from Echizen Washi paper, a traditional Japanese craft with a 1500-year history. Artisans create this leaf patterned paper by hand so when sunlight hits the fan a silhouette of tree leaves appear. It’s a lovely reminder that there are ways of appreciating the summer, rather than escape into air conditioning.

komorebi-uchiwa_washi

I’ve featured the work of Chinese artist Li Hongbo before. Look closely, and you’ll see how he flattens a paper sculpture in the shape of a handgun as he sets up his work ‘Ocean of Flowers’ at Eight One Art Museum in Beijing June 17, 2017.

— Reuters pic

— Reuters pic

Check out these artist-designed wallpapers by the likes of contemporary artists such as Kiki Smith, James Welling, John Baldessari and Vik Muniz, to name a few. New York-based Artware Editions works with artists and fabricators to produce all sorts of functional objects.

Brooklyn-based Flavor Paper collaborated with the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts for its Elvi wallpaper ($225 per 15-foot roll, flavorpaper.com). (Flavor Paper)

Brooklyn-based Flavor Paper collaborated with the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts for its Elvi wallpaper ($225 per 15-foot roll, flavorpaper.com). (Flavor Paper)

Last but not least! These are amazing – bonsai trees made of blooming paper cranes by Naoki Onogawa.

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Sunday Paper ClickIf you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left (I made that paper) to see how you can provide support.

And if you run a paper-related business, you might be interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks again to those of you who have pledged your support, and enjoy your Sunday!

What a Mess! (a new book)

The Sunday Paper #163, June 25, 2017

Paper of the Week: Silk Screened Indian Handmade

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There is a wide selection of imported silkscreen papers from India, and I found this one on a recent visit to Two Hands Paperie in Boulder.

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On the Road:

My daughter’s BFF in Portland was in a fashion show that we went to a couple of nights ago. Her outfit was gorgeous, but what I’m showing here is a Coat of Hope created by the artist Nancy Judd (who specializes in Eco Trash Couture and so much more). This coat is made from Tyvek and attendees were invited to write their hope/s on a strip of Tyvek which was attached to the garment.

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Papery Tidbits:

  • Please contact me if you’re interested in promoting your business by sponsoring a month in the 2018 Twelve Months of Paper Calendar.
  • I’ll be launching my biannual online paper sale next month! Stay tuned for a selection of handmade papers you won’t find anywhere else in the world!

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Keith Allen’s new pop-up book, What A Mess! is now available online and in stores! It’s no secret that most children do not like to pick-up after themselves. Packed with amazing paper pop-ups, this book sets out to promote personal responsibility by answering the question: “What would happen if we just didn’t clean-up?” The complex paper-engineering makes this book exciting for all ages and the hilarious story is perfect for both boys and girls ages 3-8.

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Check out these sculptural books by Mumbai based book sculptor Banoo Batliboi rescues old abandoned books and reimagines them in new forms. Batliboi’s works are quite diverse, so click through to read an interview and view more.

Banoo-Batliboi-Tesselations-2

Here’s a cute pop-up penguin to brighten your day! This structure has been around for a long time and utilizes a rubber band, but I’ve never seen a double stacked version like this with one polyhedron on top of the other!

For those of you into computer programming, researchers at MIT have created a universal algorithm for folding origami shapes that guarantees a minimum number of seams. This is a bit above my head, but hooray for the intersection of math and art (and hopefully some of you will find this useful)!

Demaine

I discovered these sweet pop-up Portland bridge cards by local artist John Bacone at a little shop on NW 23rd. Google his name + vimeo to watch the bridges in action.

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Sunday Paper ClickIf you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left (I made that paper) to see how you can provide support.

And if you run a paper-related business, you might be interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks again to those of you who have pledged your support, and enjoy your Sunday!

Magnetic Paper

The Sunday Paper #163, June 18, 2017

Happy Fathers Day!!

Paper of the Week: Duplex Paper

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If you look closely, you can see the edges of the papers above are white. That indicates that the other side of each sheet is also white. I’m making these double-sided (duplex) papers for my next artist’s book, Tangential. I am working my way through the range of chromatic colors, and I’ll end up with ten assorted papers in a few weeks! You’ll have to wait to see the significance of the double-sided papers in the book – there is a reason!

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In the Studio:

For me, designing a book is the fun part: copy writing, layout, graphic design, paper selection/making, printing, binding, and more! And then it is finally time to create the actual book. I’m still in the design phase (yay!) and had fun this week exploring the potential of magnetic paint. Here’s a little video showing my experiment.

Papery Tidbits:

  • Please contact me if you’re interested in promoting your business by sponsoring a month in the 2018 Twelve Months of Paper Calendar.
  • Tomorrow we take off on a road trip to Portland. I’m teaching at the Focus on Book Arts Conference next weekend and will have papers & books at the trade fair on Friday & Saturday. Stop by!

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Just the other day, I noticed a pop-up book in the little free library box in our neighborhood! That’s quite the antithesis of collector Ellen K. Rubin (aka the Popuplady’s) experience. Rubin never saw a pop-up book as she was growing up. When she bought two for her young sons in the 1980s, she was amazed, and her collection now boasts 9,000 pop-ups!

A close-up of a pop-up book paper cheetah. PIXABAY

A close-up of a pop-up book paper cheetah. PIXABAY

Whoa, that’s a LOT of books! The Parthenon of Books by artist Marta Minujín is a decisive symbol of resistance to any banning of writings and the persecution of their authors. As many as 100,000 formerly or currently banned books from all over the world were used to create the work, which is now on view at Dokumenta in Kassel, Germany.

Marta Munujin, The Parthenon of Books, 2017, steel books and plastic sheeting, Friederichsplatz, Kassel, dokumenta 14, photo: Roman März

Marta Munujin, The Parthenon of Books, 2017, steel books and plastic sheeting, Friederichsplatz, Kassel, dokumenta 14, photo: Roman März

Check out this amazing paper cut performance piece by Erik Ruin. Long/Gone premiered on Friday at the Rotunda in Philadelphia with the Ominous Cloud Ensemble. The West Philly-based artist brings his images to life as a succession of images beam out from an overhead projector.

An excerpt from “Long/Gone.” COURTESY ERIK RUIN/FOR PHILLYVOICE

An excerpt from “Long/Gone.” COURTESY ERIK RUIN/FOR PHILLYVOICE

I’ve enjoyed listening to the podcast series Make/Time. Here’s a great episode in which moderator Stuart Kestenbaum speaks with David Keefe, a printmaker, visual artist, executive director of Combat Paper NJ and a former United States Marine who served in Iraq and is Senior Assistant Dean of Student Veterans’ Initiatives in the General Studies Program at Columbia University.

Make Time

This is an interesting article about how researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology are exploring the potential of origami to control the amount of incoming light in a room and studying how the resulting light patterns could affect homeowners.

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Sunday Paper ClickIf you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left (I made that paper) to see how you can provide support.

And if you run a paper-related business, you might be interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks again to those of you who have pledged your support, and enjoy your Sunday!

Tyvek

The Sunday Paper #162, June 11, 2017

Paper of the Week: Tyvek

Tyvek Lantern

I love Tyvek, a paper-like material that is strong, durable, water resistant and easy to paint or stain. These tesselating lanterns are the June project in the Twelve Months of Paper Calendar (check out the 2018 cover design below).

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Out of the Studio:

My daughter plays the cello, so when we read that Russick Smith would be performing on a tiny island in the middle of a river in Breckenridge, we decided  to drive over for the evening event. He walked through the water wearing waders and then took them off to play barefoot. Due to heavy snow melt, this island will be engulfed by water soon!

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I love clever designs, and here’s a good papery one: the Paper Saver Notebook. What a simple solution to for reusing printed paper, reducing waste, and doing a bit more for the environment – in a stylish way!

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If you’re in the Seattle area, don’t miss this exhibition of Julie Chen’s artist’s books. A career retrospective of over 30 of her highly imaginative art books is currently on view in Every Moment of a Book: Three Decades of Work by Julie Chen at the University of Washington Libraries’ Special Collections. You can order an exhibition catalog here.

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New on Paper Talk (my podcast series, subscribe on ITunes): Michelle Wilson. Michelle and I had a conversation in her Oakland studio when I was visiting the Codex Book Fair earlier this year.

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Here’s a sneak peak of the 2018 Twelve Months of Paper Calendar, which will be available this fall, along with a brand new Custom Paper Pack featuring a variety of decorative papers from around the world. Start making your holiday wish list!

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Okay, this has nothing to do with paper (literally) but figuratively speaking, this 3D printed pasta is magical and similar to the dimensional shrinking work that several paper artists are doing, including myself. If you watch the video of Michelle Wilson’s studio (see mention above) you’ll see some shrunken paper pieces as well.

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About Me

Hi, I'm Helen Hiebert!
I'm an artist working primarily in handmade paper; I write how-to books and make films about papermaking and paper arts; and I love learning about new techniques and methods for working with paper! You can learn more about me at http://www.helenhiebertstudio.com

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