S... T... E... Art... M

The Sunday Paper #150, March 19, 2017

Paper of the Week: Vellum

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Vellum is probably the first translucent paper I discovered. It has a wonderful crisp quality that makes it perfect for cutting and folding. This project will be featured in the 2018 Twelve Months of Paper Calendar.

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In the Studio:

Fair warning: this is political. It is so sad that some people think art is something we need like a hole in the head. As you’ll read in the following edition of The Sunday Paper, there are so many benefits to art, and it can be viewed in many lights. I’d like to think that this is just a misunderstanding in a few brains that could be corrected with a word scramble! Do you see the pattern?

Trumpart

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There’s a lot of talk about science and art these days, and STEAM (A is for Art) is a debated term in education (I’m guessing you know more about this than I do, but I did find this article enlightening). Just this week, I was telling my childhood friend – a physics and math teacher – about a method of constructing a lampshade. She immediately had ideas for how to develop a geometry lesson around this project for her math class. But I digress… here’s a great big story about origami physicist and paper artist Robert J. Lang.

There’s a new episode on Paper Talk, featuring an interview with Jillian Bruschera whose Mobile Mill and Papermaker’s Pack are both innovative and inspirational. Have a listen! You can also subscribe to Paper Talk on ITunes.

Jillian

So, there is something about labels, in this case the word artist. Sachin George Sebastian answers to engineer, architect, sculptor, or artist. Too bad artist appears last in the list, but this begs the question: why label? And what’s the difference anyways?

sgs

This is (slightly) old news, but Tahiti Pehrson makes enormous paper cuts, and this year they were featured as interactive columns for visitors to Art on Paper to experience.

Tahiti Pehrson, “The Fates” (2016), hand-cut paper installation, presented by Art at Viacom.

Tahiti Pehrson, “The Fates” (2016), hand-cut paper installation, presented by Art at Viacom.

Here’s a great story about a hands-on class at John’s Hopkins, in which students learn how to organize an exhibition of artists’ books.

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About Me

Hi, I'm Helen Hiebert!
I'm an artist working primarily in handmade paper; I write how-to books and make films about papermaking and paper arts; and I love learning about new techniques and methods for working with paper! You can learn more about me at http://www.helenhiebertstudio.com

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