The Paper Library

Welcome to The Paper Library, a growing resource for paper lovers. Here you will find all of the papers that have been featured in The Sunday Paper. Click on the thumbnails below to learn more about each paper, and check back weekly to discover new papers! 

1-abacus
Abaca Leather with Embedded String
grow-note-green
Grow A Note Green®
kite-paper
Kite Paper
stained-tyvek
Stained Tyvek
Kyoseishi-Collage-600x464
Kyoseishi
MIxed-Elephant-Hide-600x238
Elephant Hide
unryu.jpg-600x390
Thai Unryu
Traceroll-600x338
Tracing Paper
HK-0061_1024x1024
Akotosashi
 IMG_2332-600x540
Handmade Cotton/Abaca Blend
IMG_2323-596x600
Abaca with Embedded String
IMG_2457
Brew Paper 
 Envelope Folding Screen 
Envelope Paper
AG_PourPapers
Pour Papers 
IMG_2614-600x322
Abaca with Embedded Wire 
 Ring-560x600 
Vellum
72 Graph Paper
Graph Paper
73 Hosta
Hosta Paper
74 Pleated Abaca
Pleated Abaca
75 Shaped Paper
Shaped Paper
paper-string77
Paper String
 kakishibu78
Kakishibu
 money-paper79
Money Paper
 madeleine-durham80
Madeleine Dunham Papers
 envelopes81
Envelopes
 marbled-momi83
Thai Marbled Momi
 
Mizuhiki Paper Cord
 stephen-white25-5
Stephen White
 kristopherson25-9
Susan Kristoferson Paste Paper
 oblation25-11
Oblation Papers
repeat25-19 
Repeat Paperie
verso25-21
 Verso Jewelry
chiyogami25-23 
Chiyogami
Hidden Currents detail 
Bark Fiber
wax-paper89 
Wax Paper
duplex90 
Duplex Paper
 origami-paper
Origami Paper
   
     
     

1-abacus

Abaca Leather with Embedded String

This is a handmade abaca paper; those of you who follow my work know that I’m obsessed with abaca, a fiber from the leaf stalk of a non-fruit bearing banana plant. I’ve developed this paper over the years. It is made from premium abaca fiber that I beat in my Reina beater for about 3 hours. Next, I double-couch two sheets of paper, sandwiching a thin linen thread in between. The sheet was air dried, misted and then dried under restraint. The papers featured in the Support The Sunday Paper button above are pigmented abaca leather (one layer, no string). I’m making this particular paper for my next artists’ book, 50 Revolutions, and you’ll be able to purchase the extra sheets during my on-line paper sale later this summer.

 

grow-note-green

Grow A Note Green®

Grow A Note® papers are handmade from 100% post-consumer pulp in San Diego, California. The paper hues (in a range of 40 colors) come from earth pigments, and they are embedded with wildflower seeds. They also make a selection of papers with herbs or vegetables. The sheets are 13×19 inches with a natural deckle edge on all four sides, and natural white (no color) is easiest to print. Greenfield Paper offers offset printing services, and while they can print full color, they recommend two or three color for cost and because of the nuances of printing on handmade paper. Grow A Note® papers can be used for greeting cards, invitations, promotional pieces (mailings and handouts) and packaging.

Where to find Grow A Note® Green: Greenfield Paper Company

 

kite-paper

Kite Paper

I discovered kite paper when my daughter went to a Waldorf preschool and they made these gorgeous folded and layered paper light catchers. It is just like wax paper, and it comes in a dozen brilliant colors. You can purchase it in large sheets or in packs of assorted colors that are cut to 6-1/4″ square. The first project in my book Playing With Paper features a how-to project for making the window star pictured above. I also sell a Window Star Kit that includes 10 sheets of kite paper and instructions. I think you can imagine that the variations on this project are infinite, and I love the way that light filtering through the layers adds dimension to these stars. They are also fun and simple to make!

Where to find Kite Paper: 

You can purchase kite paper on the internet or in Waldorf school brick and mortar shops.

 

stained-tyvek

Stained Tyvek

I learned about Tyvek® in a workshop (perhaps with Hedi Kyle) and then picked it up again a couple of years ago when I was designing projects for my book Playing With Paper.

It folds really well, is super strong and water resistant. It’s that stuff they use in construction, protective apparel and packaging (no wonder I like it – it has qualities of paper and cloth). It comes in white (and black) and I use watered-down acrylic paints to pigment my sheets, brushing the paint on with a foam sponge and wiping off the excess. The staining picks up the texture in the Tyvek®, which creates a lovely pattern.

Where to find Tyvek®: Material Concepts

By the way, Tyvek® is not paper, but the way it cames about sounds really similar to the story told about T’sai Lun (credited with making the first paper). I love the story of inventions. T’sai Lun is said to have noticed the fibers from laundry collecting on rocks in the river and matting together. The discovery of Tyvek® was made by a DuPont researcher, Jim White, who in 1955 noticed white polyethylene fluff coming out of a pipe in a DuPont experimental lab. A program to develop the new material was set up, and a year later DuPont submitted a patent proposal for this strong yarn linear polyethylene.

 

 

 

Kyoseishi-Collage-600x464

Kyoseishi

Kyoseishi (kee oh ‘say shi) is a crinkle-texture Japanese paper that has a cloth like drape. This paper is treated with konnyaku*  which gives it added strength and water resistance. It is great for making book covers and even clothing and comes in a variety of rich colors. Washi Arts carries a premium hand-crumpled Kyoseishi paper (some papers have the crinkle texture applied by machine) that measures 25″ x 37″.

Check out this pinterest board with examples of how artists and artisans are using Kyoseishi.

Where to find Kyoseishi: Washi Arts

* Konnyaku starch, processed from the tuberous root of the devil’s tongue plant, was traditionally used in Japan to produce a jelly‐like substance used in food. It has also been used for centuries to coat papers, especially for use in the making of kamiko paper clothing. Paper treated with konnyaku called momigami (kneaded paper) or kyoseishi (strong paper) is made both stronger and more flexible than untreated paper. Because the paper’s pores are coated it also becomes more wind and water‐resistant as well as having improved heat retention while still remaining breathable. As a lining for clothing momigami has often outlasted the textile that it lines. You can order konnyaku powder through Washi Arts too.

 

 

 

MIxed-Elephant-Hide-600x238

Elephant Hide

I’ve used elephant hide for various projects over the years and have always been impressed by its foldability and durability. Many artists use it for origami, and it it is great for all kinds of bookbinding projects as well.

Here’s a lovely review that I found in The Fold, another paper resource that you’ll want to peruse and bookmark. 

 

81NSJg-ptoL._SL1500_

Thai Unryu

Thai Unryu is a versatile paper that is inexpensive and beautiful with kozo fibers running through it. It comes in a wide variety of colors (these are only a third of them), you can get it in 25″ x 37″ sheets, and a handful of colors are available on a roll. It isn’t terribly strong, but it looks great when illuminated. I often use it to add color to the shadow lantern project that I teach. I’ve also recently started using it to create double-sided sculptural papers with embedded wire.

 

Traceroll-600x338

Tracing Paper

You know the tracing paper that you can get at any art supply store? It comes on a roll, in two colors (canary yellow and white) and in varying widths from 12″ up to at least 24″ (with a few sizes in between). Now I don’t use tracing paper for what you might think – tracing – I use it to create inflatable balls. It turns out that it is just the right weight and it has just the right amount of body (for lack of a better word) and crispness to hold its form once inflated. 

I learned quite a bit about tracing paper from the wikipedia entry. The following description actually gives me some insight into the translucent abaca paper that I use in much of my work: “Through mechanical ‘refining’ of the cellulose fibre to create a fibre which is highly fibrillated and gelatinous, so that in forming the sheet of paper, virtually all air is excluded from the internal structure of the paper. This method produces a very translucent and even looking paper”.

You can learn how to make this inflatable ball structure in my book, Playing With Paper

 

Akatosashi

This is a kozo, or Japanese mulberry paper, hailing from the Southwest of Japan. This handmade paper measures 24.8 x 38.6 inches, has a warm hue and is approximately 30 g/m². Printmakers, both novice and experienced, love working with this paper for its strength, durability, and sophisticated finish. Many book conservators like it, especially for its tone. 

Available from Paper Connection International.

IMG_2332-600x540

Handmade Cotton/Abaca Blend

I love the fact that I can concoct my own papers, even within basic cotton and abaca fibers. Over the past year I’ve experimented with various combinations of these two pulps, to create a strong, thin, smooth opaque sheet.

The sheets pictured here are a 50/50 blend, and they are bonus sheets that were on the other side of the mould when I was making an 18″ x 12″ decorative stenciled paper on an 18″ x 23″ mould (there was a reason for that, but I’m not going to go into the details here).

I crumpled one up (similar to Japanese momigami or Korean joomchi, but more on those papers in another post). This paper crumpling reminded me of my first experience with paper sculpting, when I took a sheet of notebook paper in elementary school and crumpled and re-crumpled that sheet until it was as soft as cloth.

 

IMG_2323-596x600

Abaca with Embedded String

Most of you know that I love the qualities of translucency and shrinkage inherent in abaca fiber. This long fiber is a relative of the banana plant, and I like to use the premium variety that I purchase from a papermaking supplier. I beat it hard for 3 hours in my Reina beater until the pulp is smooth and silky. The natural translucency of the fiber makes it take color really well. This sheet is colored with aqueous dispersed pigment (that’s pigment in water).

One of the first papermaking techniques I learned was how to embed objects in between sheets of handmade paper during the making process. Often I embed string – hemp or linen, because they shrink and react to the abaca fibers during the drying process – to create structural sheets of paper. I let these sheets air dry (no restraint) to give them this texture. These sheets are strong, flexible and durable.

 

IMG_2457

Brew Paper

Adding items (often referred to as inclusions) to the papermaking vat is one of the simplest ways to make unique and intriguing papers. I was recently approached by a brewery to make a prototype paper with brewery waste. They sent me a bag full of wet spent grain, which I processed lightly in a blender and mixed with pulp made of cotton linter.  

You can toss almost anything that floats into your vat of pulp just before making paper. Decorative elements should be small and lightweight so they don’t sink to the bottom of the vat; they should also be flat so they don’t cause problems when pressing.

I’ve seen papers made with inclusions like flower petals, coffee grounds, shredded money and confetti.

 

Envelope Folding Screen

Envelope Paper

I enjoy taking ordinary (or not so ordinary) objects and reimagining them. I sincerely hope that letter writing will have a comeback –  my BFF from childhood and I have started writing letters again – but in the meantime envelopes are fun to work with because they come in a variety of colors and sizes and other papers can easily be slipped into the pockets.

This envelope folding screen (from my book Playing With Paper) has a hinge that tucks into the pockets. Cut out patterns reminiscent of stained glass, slip decorative papers inside (asanoha, a Japanese lace paper, is featured here), and set the screen in a spot where it can catch some light.

Check out my pinterest board for more envelope ideas.

AG_PourPapers

Pour Papers from Arnold Grummer’s® Papermaking

Arnold Grummer is one of the grandfathers of hand papermaking, and I’m so happy that I had a chance to meet him several years ago. Arnold was inducted into the International Paper Industry Hall of Fame in 2012 for his lifetime contribution as a paper educator and passed away a few weeks later. His vast number of products, books and videos makes papermaking accessible to the masses.

Arnold fashioned his pour handmold (a mould with high sides that sits in a vat with a few inches of water, making it easy to prepare pulp for one-of-a-kind sheets of paper) after the British handsheet-former he saw scientists using in paper test labs at the Institute of Paper Chemistry. He came to rely on the pour method of papermaking in his duties as curator of the Dard Hunter Paper Museum, which was housed at the Institute (the collection is now in Atlanta). Following a tour, visitors were so excited about paper that they predictably wanted to know how they could make paper themselves. To address the question in quick fashion, he’d blend up some pulp, pour it into his basement-made handmold, form a sheet and iron it dry for them to take home. His technique took five minutes from start to dry sheet.

Check out the variety of paper colors and content shown above that were made recently when Arnold’s daughter Kim Schiedermayer (who runs the company now) led 30 women in making 60 sheets of paper in two hours in a hotel conference room. And this was their first paper making experience. Sharing two vats of water and four handmolds, they made paper by ‘pouring’.

Adding ‘paper by pouring’ to the papermaker’s repertoire can simplify logistical barriers and broaden opportunities to present classes and workshops in the community. It’s another way to enrich others with the process we love. Here’s a video of Arnold showing how to make paper using a pour handmold.

IMG_2614-600x322

Abaca with Embedded Wire

When I learned that I could embed items between two sheets of wet handmade paper during the papermaking process an entire new world opened up for me. I am perpetually interested in how I can use the papermaking process to create unique papers, how I can use innovative papermaking techniques to make my art and how I can simplify production processes. 

Here you see three sheets of handmade abaca paper with 18 gauge brass wire embedded (I’ve also used 18 gauge copper and 20 gauge stainless steel, all chosen because they don’t rust). Here’s the cool thing about this wire paper: it makes a new material – you can bend it and the wire and paper hold their shape. The orange sheet shows how the sheets look after air drying. The purple sheet has been carefully stretched out and flattened, and the yellow/green sheet has been shaped, just to give you a hint of the possibilities. I have used this technique to create lamps and lanterns of varying shapes. The translucency of the fiber makes it a natural for illumination.

Ring-560x600

Vellum

Before there was paper, vellum was a paper-like substrate made from calfskin, which was cleaned, bleached, stretched on a frame, and scraped to produce single pages for scrolls and books. Today, commercially produced vellum is made from plasticized cotton and the paper is translucent. Vellum has a stiff quality, which enables it to hold its shape when folded; it is often used for architectural drawings. In recent years, colored vellum papers and vellum with printed designs have become popular in scrapbooking and wedding invitation circles.

I used vellum to design this ring for my book Playing With Paper. You can run small sheets of vellum through your printer, and the translucent quality makes it perfect for lantern making. There are some tricks to using vellum. It reacts to water (puckers) so I use double sided tape or glue sticks when working with it. It is also fairly stiff, so there are limits to how you can fold it.

72 Graph Paper

Graph Paper

There are a lot of mundane papers that are pretty cool, like graph paper. I thought I’d do a little research about it, and it turns out that rectangular grid paper (used for scientific notation) was first offered for sale by a Dr. Buxton in London in 1794.

I never realized there were so many kinds of graph paper: polar coordinate graph paper, isometric graph paper, hexagonal graph paper, and the standard quad graph paper, to name a few. And there are even websites where you can print your own graph paper, like this one.

 

paper-string77Korean Paper String

Ooh la la. This is a lovely video showing two Korean artisans, Kang Seong-hi and Kim Eun-hye twisting paper string and then weaving it into vessel forms.

 

kakishibu78Kakishibu

This Kakishibu dyed 65g kozo washi Japanese paper is 7.5″ x 7.5″ and is handmade with four deckle edges and is sized. This is a wonderful sheet for small works.

Oguni is the Japanese village where the paper is made. Shikishi refers to the small square format traditionally used for calligraphy and small drawings. Kakishibu (kaki = persimmon, shibu = tannin) is fermented persimmon juice which has been aged for more than five years to extract maximum tanins which give the juice/dye waterproofing and strengthening qualities as well as a beautiful color which continues to deepen and develop over several years. These handmade kozo washi squares have been treated with multiple layers of the kakishibu ready for you to use for stencils, embellished pages for books, printmaking, collage and structures. 

You can also order natural kozo squares and kakishibu powder to treat and dye your own paper. Note that the short fibers of Western paper make it unsuitable for kakishibu as it is too weak when wet.

Washi Arts is offering this special to Sunday Paper readers:  Three sheets of handmade kozo washi scroll format paper 6.75” x 21.75” (shipped folded) with a sampler of kakishibu powder and instructions for using. Regular value is $32.00 / Special price is $25.00 

 

money-paper79Money Paper

Did you know that you can buy shredded money from the Bureau of Engraving and Printing? They sell 5 pound bags of shredded U.S. currency that contain approximately $10,000 in shredded bills.  I made the linen/shred mix that lies beneath the dollar bill pictured here and Jessica Spring used that paper to make her book Rags to Riches. My friend Susan made the paper on the left by mixing the shredded currency with kozo.

 

madeleine-durham80Madeleine Durham Paste Papers

Madeleine Durham creates innovative paste papers. She enjoys working in a painterly fashion using a brush technique to create a contemporary flair for fine bookbinders, collage artists and crafters. Pigmented pastes allow her to vividly express the colorful and fluid abstraction of the style which defines her work.

Lively shapes and bold patterns are a central part of her rich imagery. Durham’s papers are 100% archival made with Golden acrylics and Jin-Shofu wheat paste. Currently, she is working on Arches Text Wove. Her papers are grain short and are slightly larger than 13” x 25” which is a third of a mother sheet of Arches.

Durham is experimenting with new patterns on kozo which will be available soon. She is also creating larger papers for binders who require more than a 13” short grain, and smaller kozo papers with intricate designs specifically with miniature book binders in mind. Durham currently has a line of greeting cards and printed silk scarves are coming soon. In the upcoming weeks check Etsy for her new line of 1″ strips and 4″ squares for artists who wish to use a range of smaller pieces in collage and crafts.

 

envelopes81Envelope Paper

I love developing new uses for common products. Envelopes are attractive because they are like pockets. I’ve developed two projects (featured in my book Playing With Paper) – the Mini Photo Album and the Envelope Folding Screen. Each one requires cutting “windows” through the envelopes so that you can see photographs or decorative papers that are inserted into the pockets. If you use a translucent insert, illumination can be part of the equation.  

 

marbled-momi83

Thai Marbled Momi

Look what you can do with Thai Momi Mulberry Paper! From decorating to jewelry and from collage to sculpture, this versatile paper is an beautiful medium for all sorts of projects. Take a peek at these pictures to see what some of our customers have created using this unique paper.

Mulberry Paper and More is offering this special to Sunday Paper Readers: A pack of color coordinated Marbled Momi papers for $10.95, a savings of $6 off of the regular price. Use coupon code: SUNDAY.Click here for this special offer!

Thai Momi Paper starts with pulp from Bamboo and the discarded bark of the Mulberry Tree and is machine formed into a fine paper sheet. To create the beautiful and unique designs, oil-based paint is dropped on top of a vat of water and then swirled creating a marble design. The sheet of paper is then laid on top of the water absorbing the paint design. The Momi Paper is quickly removed and set aside to dry. It is then further dyed using a tie-dye technique to infuse color into the base sheet. While still wet from the tie-dye, the paper is then crumpled creating its unique, soft cotton fabric-like feel.

Because each sheet is hand-marbled and dyed, no two sheets will ever be the same. Enjoy the soft feel and texture of this paper. Once you put it to use in your project, you will have a hard time using normal paper again.

 

Mizuhiki Paper Cord

Mizuhiki is a traditional Japanese paper cord that come in many colors and is often tied in elaborate knots as decoration for gifts, especially money wrappers. Cords come in many colors, in shiny mylar foil, wrapped in silk thread, or simply painted. It is said that Samurai used Mizuhiki to tie their topknots. The cords are 36” long and you can discover many ways to use them. Our favorite way to use Mizuhiki is to gather 3 or 5 cords to tie up gift packages. A simple square knot holds the cords in place, and you can even thread the ends back through the center knot to create simple and elegant designs.

Explore the possibilities of Mizuhiki for yourself with this special offer: a selected sampler of 100 assorted cords (retail value $35) for only $15 including shipping. A complete list of all the colors available and an instruction sheet for how to tie two basic knots will be included. Place your order at our retail website. If you find yourself in the San Francisco Bay area, please visit our retail store Paper Tree in the Japantown area, or our newly acquired store Miki’s Paper on Fourth Street in Berkeley.

A bit of history: since washi paper is very strong, it was natural to take long narrow strips and twist them into twine for tying packages (and for tying samurai’s long hair into top knots). At some point the twine was painted and tied into elaborate knots for decoration.  At wedding ceremonies Mizuhiki is tied into a male and a female butterfly and used to adorn sake bottles.  At most weddings and other special occasions, Mizuhiki is tied onto folded paper envelopes used for money gifts, a tradition that continues today.

 

stephen-white25-5Luminessence

Luminessence is the essence of light captured in hand-crafted light sculptures of laminated paper and wood. Since 1964 this original art form has been evolving through the creative vision of artist Stephen White.

I met Stephen when I lived in Portland, OR (he lives and works in Eugene) and was immediately drawn to his work, as you might imagine. His creations are made using a fine grade of tissue which is laminated – about a dozen layers – papier mache’ fashion, creating a translucent ‘skin’ that is both beautiful in the way it diffuses light and durable for longevity. The surface appearance of a Luminessence light sculpture is parchment-like in texture and color. The pieces are non-collapsible and come wired ready for installation. Each piece is signed, dated and numbered signifying it as an original work of art. These works are designed for residential or commercial interiors where a unique artistic expression in lighting is desired.

I have a copy of this lovely 36 min DVD by Bruce Kubert, which includes the story of Stephen’s creative exploration of light sculpture, as well as an extended slide show. You can purchase a copy here.

About Our Sponsor: Luminessence for most of Stephen’s career has been a solo artist’s studio. Periodically, he has trained others as apprentices, and some of them have gone on to establish their own artistic vision in this medium. Luminessence is represented in showrooms and galleries in Seattle, Portland, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Honolulu, New York City and Stephen’s home town, Eugene, Oregon. His studio and home are his ‘gallery’, too and may be visited by appointment.

 

kristopherson25-9Susan Kristoferson Paste Paper

Susan Kristoferson has specialized in hand-painted and dyed papers since 1990, including the traditional Japanese fold and dye technique of itajime. At her studio in the foothills of Southern Alberta in Canada, she works on many innovative designs as well as historic reproductions.

 

oblation25-11Oblation Papers

When I moved to Portland, OR in the late 1990’s, I worked part-time at Oblation Papers & Press, a gorgeous stationery store in the Pearl District with a production paper mill and a full-blown letterpress shop – a must-see when visiting the Pacific Northwest!

Oblation Papers & Press produces handmade paper stationery, custom wedding invitations and these pure cotton full-deckled handmade paper shapes, fashioned one-at-a-time, where they employ traditional 19th century techniques to make sheets of cotton paper by hand using recycled remnants from the garment industry. These papers are strong, acid-free and perfectly suited for letterpress printing.

 

repeat25-19Repeat Paperie

Repeat Paperie handmade papers are created from 100% recycled materials, mostly old cotton clothing. This allows us to offer very vibrantly colored, soft papers. Once the papers are dry they are ready for the letterpress! We use either polymer plates or our collection of lead type to create the text and/or images needed for our projects.

We are a brand new company and are slowly but surely expanding our portfolio to include holiday cards, invitations, stationery, business cards, and other paper goods.

 

 

verso25-21Verso Jewelry

Melanie Brauner combines her training in papermaking and metalsmithing to create VERSO, her line of paper and metal jewelry. The forms are inspired by the homes insects build, such as coccoons, chrysalises, and hives, as well as other shapes found in nature, like the bends in a river, or the curves of a willow leaf, or the pistil of a flower.

Melanie first forms silver, copper, and brass into small frameworks, which are then dipped into abaca paper pulp. The paper fibers cling to the metal and create a webbed network in the open spaces, which shrinks as it dries. Over successive dips in more pulp, a tight paper skin is built up over the form. This technique is called dip-casting, and takes several days of dipping and drying to complete. The resulting paper beads and pendants are sealed to make them durable and waterproof, and then turned into delicate necklaces and earrings using sterling silver wire and chain, and freshwater pearls. 

 

chiyogami25-23Chiyogami

Hand screened chiyogami papers are the ambassadors of Japanese paper. They are immediately recognizable and beloved by artists and designers. The patterns are gorgeous, the printing of them is exquisite, the colors vibrant, and the range is amazing. You will likely have used chiyogami at some point in your artwork and this year we’d like to tell you more about these papers, inspire you to use them in your work and learn about the patterns.

There are more than 700 patterns of chiyogami currently available and Washi Arts has several hundred in stock at any one time for immediate delivery or ordering. While the patterns look wonderful on the website, it is not the same as seeing the paper for yourself, so Washi Arts has created a Limited Edition Sample Box  with a hand-picked selection of 480 3” x 3” pieces of hand-screened chiyogami for reference and use in your studio over the course of the year ahead. You can learn more below or by clicking this link.

About Chiyogami

Wonderfully decorative patterns on paper, known as chiyogami, are silkscreened onto machine made sheets of mixed kozo and sulphite.  They are more popularly known as yuzen in the United States.

Originally, chiyogami designs were developed in the Edo period as fine woodblock prints by papermakers during the farming season. They were based on the bright kimono textiles which the papermakers from the country saw on the fashionable wealthier ladies in the cities, especially Kyoto, where the Yuzen area had become famous for its sophisticated techniques for dyeing cloth.

The range of Chiyogami patterns is astounding, and Japanese designers today are tireless in their development of new fascinating patterns. 

Washi Arts Limited Edition Chiyogami Sample Box Set

Starting in January 2016, you will be able to acquire a limited edition chiyogami box set of 450+ samples. Each month subscribers will receive a hand selected grouping of Japanese patterned papers. The monthly package could be a selection of of birds, geometrics, stripes, florals or traditional patterns. Some months will include custom, limited edition or rare patterns. Each mailing will include educational and inspirational information about chiyogami. In addition you will receive a subscriber discount code to enter on the website, if you wish to purchase full size sheets of any of the samples you receive in that month.

The starter package of box, dividers, and first set of samples is $45.00 and each month after that is $25.00. By this time next year subscribers will have acquired a set of close to 500 samples of hand-screened Japanese chiyogami paper. This set is limited to an edition of 110. The subscription fee includes mailing. If you live outside the US, please email info@washiarts.com for pricing.

 

duplex90

Duplex Paper

My first job after college was with a commercial printing company in New York City, and I learned a lot about paper there. One of the papers I was introduced to was duplex papers, which are usually a cover stock consisting of two sheets that are laminated together: one color on one side and another color on the other. I often make double-sided sheets in the papermaking process, to add imagery to a book cover, but there are many other applications. This commercially available Purple/Aegean Paper features two sheets of thai unryu paper laminated together in a purple and teal combination.

 

wax-paper89

Wax Paper

I ran across a story about 16 Genius Wax Paper Tips and it got me thinking. I remember my mom teaching me how to wrap a sandwich in wax paper – there was a special fold that made a nice pouch. And as a kid I loved melting crayon shavings between sheets of wax paper for a stained glass window effect. I’ve made pleated and crumpled papers with abaca handmade paper, but I decided to pleat and crumple some wax paper to see what happened when I ironed it. The wax melted and the overlapping areas stuck! 

 

 

Hidden Currents detailKozo Bark Fiber

When I’m in Boulder, I usually visit my friend and colleague Jill Powers, and I had the opportunity to see her this weekend. She’s got a wonderfully inspiring studio where she has developed advanced casting techniques for working with kozo (mulberry) bark. Jill teaches innovative techniques for working with this fiber in her Kozo Bark Fiber Course (technically, this isn’t really paper, but.) She is currently working on an exhibition – Holdfast: Seaweeds in a Time of Oceanic Change –  that will debut at the Dairy Arts Center in Boulder on March 4th. If you are in Colorado, I hope to see you there!

 

 

Origami PaperOrigami Paper

I’m guessing that you’ve heard about (or perhaps even participated in) the adult coloring book craze. Now it seems that origami might take its place (or join in). I’ve dabbled in origami over the years and love to discover printed origami papers (I found the papers pictured here in a shop in Korea a few years ago with two full aisles dedicated to printed origami papers in a variety of sizes). I know there are folders who use all sorts of other papers for origami too.

What papers have you used for origami, and I wonder if there are any artists out there who have done origami with shaped papers?